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Wednesday, January 27
 

14:30 UTC

Welcome Ceremony
Join us to kick off PIDapalooza21, the world's first and only 24-hour festival of persistent identifiers!

This session will include all the information you need to familiarize yourself with the festival.  

Moderators
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director of Community Engagement, NISO

Speakers
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library - CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)
avatar for Matthew Buys

Matthew Buys

Executive Director, DataCite
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager, California Digital Library


Wednesday January 27, 2021 14:30 - 15:00 UTC
Stage 1

15:00 UTC

How PIDs have made my life easy and what could be improved
As a millennial scientist, I “grew up” with PIDs and I was not fully aware that they were a relatively recent addition to the world of science. DOIs and ORCIDs were PIDs I took for granted because they were already around -or recently implemented- when I started my career. Even though PIDs have made my entire career very easy, there is always room for improvement. I will give my perspective as a scientist in academia on why I love PIDs and what could be improved.

Moderators
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director of Community Engagement, NISO

Speakers
avatar for Adriana Romero-Olivares

Adriana Romero-Olivares

Assistant Professor, New Mexico State University
Dr. Romero-Olivares is a soil microbiologist who works at the intersection of ecosystem ecology and evolution. She is interested in understanding how microbes respond and adapt to environmental stress. Her overall research goal is to better understand and plan for ecosystem-scale... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 15:00 - 15:30 UTC
Stage 1

15:30 UTC

All PIDs are equal, but some PIDs are more equal than others: why arXiv is choosing DOIs
arXiv has a strong and consistent PID that has resolved flawlessly for almost 30 years. It has served arXiv as well as our partners for a long time, and it is not going to disappear. Yet, there is some value that only a DOI can offer: belonging to a community, being part of an ecosystem, using coherent metadata schemas, ensuring communication and links across different entities is consistent. Here will be presented the reasons why arXiv chose to use DOIs and the expectations for the future of arXiv

Moderators
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director of Community Engagement, NISO

Speakers
avatar for Eleonora Presani

Eleonora Presani

Executive Director, arXiv - Cornell Tech
Product Leader with a passion for knowledge. I'm bringing the experience of product development to arXiv with the mission of supporting open science, reproducibility and collaboration.I am specially passionate about delivering the right information at the right time, leveraging the... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 15:30 - 16:00 UTC
Stage 1

16:00 UTC

Research projects: the fulcrum of the research world
What do you think of when you hear the word RAID? Johnny Depp style pirates battling it out on the high seas? RAIDing the refrigerator Nigella Lawson style? Spraying a can of RAID on some pesky biting bugs? Whatever it is, it infers you will be “doing” something. RAID in the identifier world applies best to “doing” things. It’s an identifier for activities that puts research projects at the centre. At its core, RAID is a Handle which acts like a web address for a project or group of activities, and it comes with an “envelope” which contains a record of events and entities related to the project or activity. Examples of things that are related to a project include Data Management Plans, research publications, datasets, researchers, institutions, grants etc. RAID can record all of these related entities in the envelope using their appropriate PIDs (DOIs, ORCIDs etc). There is significant interest in RAID internationally and in this session, we will unpack RAID and answer such questions as:
What are the use cases for RAID? Who benefits from RAID?
What’s the difference between a Grant Identifier (DOI) and a RAID? Do you need both?
Who manages RAID and how many are using it?
How does RAID interact with ORCIDs, DOIs and other identifiers?
How is RAID being used in the research Openness Profile?
What are the plans for the RAID identifier service going forward in terms of technical, governance and community aspects?

RAID is flagged for ISO certification in May 2021. This is an opportunity to hear more about RAID and how you may wish to use it.

Moderators
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491

Speakers
avatar for Fiona Murphy

Fiona Murphy

Co-Founder, Partnerships & Community Development, MoreBrains Cooperative Consulting
Fiona Murphy is on a mission to improve knowledge - what we know we know, who gets to know it, and what we do with it. She loves connecting things to other things (people, ideas, projects), so is a natural proponent of all things PID-tastic. One of the four Co-founders of MoreBrains... Read More →
avatar for Natasha Simons

Natasha Simons

Associate Director, Data & Services, Australian Research Data Commons
Natasha Simons has her head in the clouds - literally, technically and figuratively. She loves research data and making good stuff happen. As Associate Director, Data & Services, at the Australian Research Data Commons she is responsible for programs that support the development of... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 16:00 - 16:30 UTC
Stage 2

16:00 UTC

Putting the P in PIDs 
Persistence is often taken for granted yet it is key for a sustainable research infrastructure. But what do we mean by persistence? Is it the identifier? The thing it identifies? Or the place where the thing lives? Or something else? Or all or some or none?

This session will help the audience explore the famous 5 persistencies* and consider what identifier systems can do to guarantee persistence now and into the future.

*https://andrew.treloar.net/research/diagrams/five_persistences.pdf

Moderators
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library - CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Clark

Jonathan Clark

Managing Agent, The DOI Foundation


Wednesday January 27, 2021 16:00 - 16:30 UTC
Stage 1

16:00 UTC

Portugues - Um guia para principiantes em Identificadores Persistentes
Se você é novo no mundo dos identificadores persistentes ou apenas precisa de uma atualização básica sobre PIDs, esta sessão introdutória é para você! Explicaremos o que é um identificador persistente, o que eles podem fazer e por que são importantes; e compartilharemos informações sobre alguns dos principais PIDs. Nosso experiente e entusiasta palestrante vai responder às suas perguntas e compartilhar as informações necessárias para que você mesmo seja uma pessoa PID!

Speakers

Wednesday January 27, 2021 16:00 - 16:30 UTC
Stage 3

16:30 UTC

Persistently mis-identified works: lessons learned from a deep dive into Dryad's metadata
For years at Dryad we've supported best practices for PIDs - the first repository to implement ROR, co-author verified ORCIDs, ORCID login, etc. In looking to pidify the related works section to better meet researcher and PID graph needs around tying together related articles, data, software, preprints, etc, we cleaned up 100,000 rows of data and came to understand the barriers to a complete PID landscape in data publishing.

Join this session for a brainstorm on how we can better address issues like non-DOIs, relation types, and interfaces to better educate researchers on PID practices.

Moderators
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library - CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)

Speakers
avatar for Daniella Lowenberg

Daniella Lowenberg

Data Publishing Product Manager, California Digital Library
Product Manager for Dryad at California Digital Library and member of the Make Data Count team working to provide stewardship for open data and develop meaningful metrics for measuring the impact of data in the research world. Many kinds of identifiers are the connectors in this world and Daniella is working with many partners to make those connections happen... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 16:30 - 17:00 UTC
Stage 1

16:30 UTC

Research.fi is a national PID-graph implementation
The research.fi portal implements the concept of interconnecting different types of research outputs and research actors mostly though the utilisation of Permanent Identifiers (PIDs). The PID graph concept was introduced by Fenner and Aryani (1), which presents an approach that proposes the use of RESTful APIs. Our research.fi is a national portal that currently handles data integration via other less dynamic mechanisms, but still achieves the endgoal of interconnected research outputs. This is an active area of development, with other efforts on-going, such as the OpenAIRE Research Graph (2), Research Graph (3) , Scholix (4).

(For missing figure 1, see research output type banner at: https://research.fi/en/ )

The research.fi aims to connect publications, with corresponding funding decisions, with research infrastructures and research datasets used in the study. While the data can be browsed by any aspect, and the linked data navigated through interconnected links, from our service design perspective, the central node in this graph is the researcher. That being said, many of the connections do not directly involve researchers. A user can view data from different perspectives, such as :
1) Datasets resulting from a given infrastructure
2) Datasets and publications generated under a given funding decision
3) Funding awarded to organisations
4) A given researcher’s publications, funding decisions, datasets, etc…

The research.fi service was published in June 2020 with the data types shown in figure 1. The incorporation of the additional data types is on-going. Naturally we will have the same hurdle as the other concurrent efforts, which is to find the information on how these different types of data items are connected to each other. Integrated systems have provided possibilities to give information e.g. on the projects relating to datasets, but such voluntary information is not frequently volunteered by the researchers entering data. The simplest and most unique way to establish these connections is via the use of PIDs. E.g. a connection from a publication to an author is made, when the user gives her ORCID identifier when submitting a paper to a journal.
Once the connections are established, many of the dataproviders are interested to read back the enriched connection data to the data that they have provided.

References
(1) Fenner, M., Aryani, A., 2019. Introducing the PID Graph — FREYA [WWW Document]. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.5438/jwvf-8a66
(2) https://zenodo.org/record/2600275#.X4XLfWgzY2w
(3) https://researchgraph.org/
(4) http://www.scholix.org/

Moderators
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491

Speakers
avatar for Tommi Suominen

Tommi Suominen

Information architect, CSC - IT for Science
I am an interdisciplinary expert focusing on the software solution development, with working experience from both science and industry. In my present role as a information architect at CSC, my current topical focus is the (semantic) interoperability of IT services for research and... Read More →



Wednesday January 27, 2021 16:30 - 17:00 UTC
Stage 2

17:00 UTC

Of ARKs and Ontologies
Demonstration of the implementation of the Archival Resource Key (ARK) Identifier specification as applied to historical ontologies, namely, the Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) from 1910.

We demonstrate how affixing an identifier to archival resources can make them computation-ready in analyzing concept-drift over time.

Moderators
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Rauch

Christopher Rauch

PhD Student, Drexel University
Christopher Rauch is currently a PhD student at Drexel University’s College of Computing and Informatics. He holds Master of Science degrees in Library and Information Science and Information Systems from Drexel and a JD from Rutgers Law School. He is a recent collaborator with... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 17:00 - 17:30 UTC
Stage 2

17:00 UTC

The PID Want Ads
WANTED: PID for an object that is not too big and not too small. One that provides just the information that I seek, and is in a language that I can understand. Not too old. Accompanied by data and resources. Available in my country. Open access only need apply.

What would a PID be without its accompanying metadata? Rich data help fulfill the FAIR promises by making information more easily findable, and by providing clarity on the constraints around being accessible (how?), interoperable (with what?), and reusable (for what purpose?)

In this session, we’ll review the 101 of Metadata and its very important relationship to PIDs. And then you’ll try your hand at identifying the metadata needed to help answer the PID Want Ads.

Moderators
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library - CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)

Speakers
avatar for Laura Paglione

Laura Paglione

Upholder, Metadata 2020
Throughout my career, I have embraced my nonlinear path as an engineer, graphic designer, consultant and computer scientist. My vast experience and unique point of view have helped me build a community of clients, colleagues, mentors, and mentees around a common goal: accessible innovation... Read More →



Wednesday January 27, 2021 17:00 - 17:30 UTC
Stage 1

17:00 UTC

Español - PIDs para principiantes
Tanto si eres nuevo en el mundo de los identificadores persistentes como si solo necesitas un repaso básico sobre PIDs, ¡esta sesión introductoria es para ti! Explicaremos lo que es un identificador persistente, lo que pueden hacer, y por qué son importantes; y compartiremos información sobre algunos PID clave. Nuestro ponente, experto y entusiasta, responderá a sus preguntas, y le proporcionará la información que necesita para convertirse en una persona PID!

Moderators
avatar for Ana Cardoso

Ana Cardoso

ORCID
Engagement Lead, Central America, Puerto Rico, Caribbean, Technology & Service Providers across the Americas

Speakers
avatar for Paloma Marín-Arraiza

Paloma Marín-Arraiza

Engagement Lead Europe, ORCID


Wednesday January 27, 2021 17:00 - 17:30 UTC
Stage 3

17:30 UTC

Identifier Politics - On Trust and PIDs
PIDs quickly have become a crucial hinge in our scholarly communications infrastructure, enabling trusted connections between people, places, and objects in networked digital space. But what level of trust do we--and should we--have in the PID providers and hosts upon whom scholarly communications now increasingly depends? Drawing on recent Educopia research on data ethics, data trusts, business modeling, and values and principles assessment, this session will consider how PID providers might build transparency and accountability into their governance structures and business models to help ensure the ways they create, collect, store, share, analyze, and report on identifiers aligns with academic values and principles.


Moderators
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director of Community Engagement, NISO

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Skinner

Katherine Skinner

Executive Director, Educopia Institute
Dr. Katherine Skinner is the Executive Director of the Educopia Institute, a not-for-profit educational organization that empowers collaborative communities to create, share, and preserve knowledge. She has helped to found the MetaArchive Cooperative, a community-owned and commun... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 17:30 - 18:00 UTC
Stage 1

17:30 UTC

Todo lo que querias saber sobre los PIDs!
Sesión en secciones:

Sección 1: Comenzaremos con una presentación introductoria explicando los básicos de los PIDs.
Los objetivos de aprendizaje:
1. Los problemas que los PIDs resuelven (descubrimiento, conectividad, procedencia)
2. Los diferentes tipos de PIDs y para qué sirven
e.g. DOIs, ROR, ORCIDs,
e.g. los objetos (investigadores, publicaciones, organizaciones, datos, instrumentos, muestras)
3. Qué son los metadatos y para qué es

Sección 2: Vamos a usar una sesión de Event Storming y con Google Jamboard, para que los participantes creen un workflow de PIDs con sticky notes de una manera interactiva (desde compartir datos hasta conseguir fondos). Los participantes van a mover los sticky notes, crear nuevas y conectarlas para desarrollar un workflow basado en lo que han aprendido en la sesión previa.

-----
Session in 2 sections.

Section 1: We will start with an introductory presentation explaining the basics of PIDs.
Learning outcomes:
1. The problems that PIDs solve (discoverability, connectivity, provenance)
2. The different types of PIDs and what they are for
e.g. DOIs, ROR, ORCIDs,
e.g. The objects (researchers, publications, organizations, data, instruments, samples)
3. What is metadata and what it’s for


Section 2: We will use an Event storming session in Google Jamboard, to allow participants to interactively create a PID workflow with sticky notes (from sharing data to getting funding). The participants will move the sticky notes around, create new ones and connect them to develop the workflow based on what they learned in the previous session.


Moderators
avatar for Ana Cardoso

Ana Cardoso

ORCID
Engagement Lead, Central America, Puerto Rico, Caribbean, Technology & Service Providers across the Americas

Speakers
avatar for Kristian Garza

Kristian Garza

Product designer, Datacite
avatar for Mary Hirsch

Mary Hirsch

Member support manager, DataCite


Wednesday January 27, 2021 17:30 - 18:00 UTC
Stage 3

18:00 UTC

How to make more publishers come to Pidapalooza. Connecting PIDS and Open Infrastructure to publisher workflows: Hindawi as a use case
This session focuses on the research and work of Alessandra Auddino, an Open Science intern at Hindawi, and presents Hindawi as a publisher use case for implementing and integrating scholarly PIDs, open metadata and open infrastructure within a variety of different publishing workflows and services. Hindawi is a proponent of Open infrastructure and already one of the leading providers of high-quality open metadata. We want to guarantee that our publications are just as ‘FAIR’ as any other scholarly dataset and to demonstrate why every publisher should be doing the same. Not only will it make publishing more effective, more reliable and more open – and so better for science and society - but it’s good for business too. But we need your feedback and input on what we’re doing, why we’re doing it and what more we might do to make what we’re doing more relevant and useful to scholarly communication.

In particular, we will briefly present research about some new use cases of ROR in the internal workflows of different departments at Hindawi, from editorial and operations to marketing and finance – and show how potential benefits for one department can have knock on benefits for others and thus act to reinforce the value of implementing RoR. We think some of these user cases could help make a more powerful argument for RoR’s adoption and implementation by other publishers.

We have also been researching how different types of internal and external information about Hindawi can be usefully brought together and shared with others to provide a new user friendly service, initially in the creation of an MVP for an open journal dashboard. This has included research on the needs and requirements of potential funders (e.g. Coalition S) and institutes, as well as our authors. It has involved identifying, locating and gathering relevant data and metadata from a variety of internal and external sources (such as from Crossref’s API). These data are being developed into a set of more open and transparent metrics about Hindawi's publications and services that can potentially be presented as part of the dashboard, and which can be visualised through a user friendly and intuitive interface. Our aim is to make this publicly available for anyone to access and explore.

Ultimately we want to demonstrate that the adoption and implementation of PIDs, open metadata and Open Infrastructure can not only strengthen the services that a publisher provides and make them more competitive, but also foster the adoption of more community owned and community governed open scholarly infrastructure for the benefit of science and society.

Moderators
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library - CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)

Speakers

Wednesday January 27, 2021 18:00 - 18:30 UTC
Stage 1

18:00 UTC

PIDs in the DINI Certificate - Follow us on stage and backstage to check out how PIDs enhance open access publications services
Welcome to the DINI stage! Join us when we go backstage to find out about how PIDs shape the character of the "2019 DINI Certificate for Open Access Publication Services". Since 2003 six editions of this hot and high quality standard for open access repositories and journals and around 100 institutions in Germany went wild to get it. After this short backstage visit which gives an intro to DINI, the German Initiative of Networked Information, the DINI Certificate will do a stage dive into the session crowd presenting all its songs (requirements and recommendations) that deal with PIDs. In a discursive jam session all party people (virtually) shout out their opinion on these criteria by either celebrating or throwing tomatoes. The remains of the party are swept together and written down in an after party blog post. #whatHappensAtPIDapaloozaStaysAtPIDapalooza

PS: If you want to go backstage you should:
1. Let us know and we'll send you a pass or follow DIY instructions on Twitter! #PIDpartyCertified
2. Wear a party dress!
3. Bring along an instrument!
4. If you don't want to be a noob, check out our short video clip on Twitter prior to PIDapalooza! #PIDpartyCertified
5. Be thrilled to party with us!

Moderators
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491

Speakers
avatar for Paul Vierkant

Paul Vierkant

Outreach Manager, DataCite
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4448-3844
avatar for Daniel Beucke

Daniel Beucke

project manager, Göttingen State and University Library
IM

Isabella Meinecke

Head of Electronic Publishing, SUB Hamburg, Germany
Isabella Meinecke leitet die Abteilung Publikationsdienste/Hamburg University Press an der Staats- und Universitätsbibliothhek Hamburg. Sie ist Open-Access-Beauftragte der Bibliothek und leitet die Arbeitsstelle Open Science. Seit vielen Jahren ist sie in unterschiedlichen Netzwerken... Read More →
TS

Thomas Severiens

DINI Deutsche Initiative Netzwerkinformation www.dini.de


Wednesday January 27, 2021 18:00 - 18:30 UTC
Stage 2

18:00 UTC

PID gratuitos para Argentina
¿Es posible siendo el estándar para artículos científicos el identificador (DOI) digital object identifier implementar en Argentina un identificador alternativo gratuito? De la misma manera que Latinoamérica ha sido pionera en la implementación del Acceso Abierto (Open Access - OA) proponemos una experiencia piloto desarrollada por editores, informáticos, bibliotecarios y diseñadores gráficos del Centro Argentino de Información Científica y Tecnológica (CAICYT) dependiente del Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) de la República Argentina para asignar un identificador único y persistente a los artículos científicos.

Moderators
avatar for Ana Cardoso

Ana Cardoso

ORCID
Engagement Lead, Central America, Puerto Rico, Caribbean, Technology & Service Providers across the Americas

Speakers

Wednesday January 27, 2021 18:00 - 18:30 UTC
Stage 3

18:30 UTC

Intrinsic identifiers at work: what the users have to say
There are two kinds of systems of identifiers around: extrinsic and intrinsic. You probably know everything already about extrinsic identifiers, as you use PIDs. Did you know that there is a new game in town? Intrinsic identifiers are here: they are computed directly from the objects they identify, and do not need minting or registration. In this session, you will discover the basics on intrinsic identifiers, and hear reald world stories from early adopters of the Software Heritage Identifiers (SWHID), the hottest intrinsic identifiers on the block.

Moderators
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491

Speakers
FA

Frederick Atherden

eLife Sciences
avatar for Roberto Di Cosmo

Roberto Di Cosmo

Director, Software Heritage
Roberto Di Cosmo (http://www.dicosmo.org) holds a PhD in Computer Science and iscurrently Computer Science professor at University Paris Diderot, after teachingfor almost a decade at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris, and spending a fewyears at INRIA. He has been actively involved... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 18:30 - 19:00 UTC
Stage 2

18:30 UTC

You shoulda put a PID on it: Leveraging the PID Graph for DMPs 
This interactive session dives into the PID Graph through the new DMP ID and demonstrates the connections now made possible between DMPs with other scholarly content (data, software,etc.) and with other PIDs (funder IDs, grant IDs, ORCIDs) via activities with the PID Graph. Come see for yourself, utilizing newly built Juypter notebooks designed by DataCite to easily explore the PID Graph via GraphQL APIs. This session will offer a brief history of machine-actionable DMPs, the new DMP ID supported by the most recent metadata scheme update by DataCite, and conclude with an interactive component where participants will be guided through both how to utilize the notebooks and how generating IDs for DMPs facilitates new connections made via the PID Graph.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Buys

Matthew Buys

Executive Director, DataCite
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library - CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)
avatar for Kristian Garza

Kristian Garza

Product designer, Datacite
avatar for Maria Praetzellis

Maria Praetzellis

Maria is Product Manager for CDL’s research data management initiatives including DMPTool, the FAIR Island Project, and the NSF-funded machine-actionable DMP grant project.
avatar for Brian Riley

Brian Riley

DMPTool Technical Lead, California Digital Library


Wednesday January 27, 2021 18:30 - 19:00 UTC
Stage 1

18:30 UTC

Adopción de ORCID en Latinoamérica
In the frame of the newly created PID Communities International area for the next PIDapalooza 2021, we, from ORCID Latin America, would be delighted to share ORCID's experience and adoption in the region, talking about strategy and policies, increase in the number of ORCiD iDs and ORCID members integrating and adding information to their researchers records, and improving data provenance, sharing and transparency in the region. We would like to take the audience on a 15 minutes' trip to what is going on in the region in terms of ORCID and other open PIDs adoption, and dive into the case of a governmental funding agency which adopted ORCID as part of the national research infrastructure, with amazing results. We would like to share the successes and the obstacles in the PIDs adoption in the Latin America region.

Speakers
avatar for Ana Cardoso

Ana Cardoso

ORCID
Engagement Lead, Central America, Puerto Rico, Caribbean, Technology & Service Providers across the Americas


Wednesday January 27, 2021 18:30 - 19:00 UTC
Stage 3

19:00 UTC

Positive people present their persistent pursuit of practically perfect priority PID partnerships
How can we balance our reliance on global networks of PIDs against national priorities? How can PID providers manage and develop research infrastructures to support international research activities whilst meeting the needs of researchers who operate in the local contexts in which research is actually done? In the UK we have developed a unified national approach to these questions, with the goal of representing our community more effectively on the global stage. We have brought together researchers, funders, administrators, publishers, librarians and technologists in a national coordinating committee especially for PIDs. We have identified the top priorities (PIDs, policies, and workflows) and we are working as a unified voice to connect with PID communities of practice from around the world. We conduct research to inform our consensus decisions, and have used this to build out long term strategic roadmaps to help our researchers and international partners alike benefit from common open PIDs. Can this approach scale? Can it really support the stability and growth of the PID network? Join us to discuss our vision - and the possible pitfalls along the way - as we strive to be the best node in the PID network we possibly can be.

Moderators
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491

Speakers
JB

Josh Brown

MoreBrains Cooperative
avatar for Christopher Brown

Christopher Brown

Product Manager, Jisc
Research data, research data management, persistent identifiers, open research, open science, standards, Jisc, RDA-UK.


Wednesday January 27, 2021 19:00 - 19:30 UTC
Stage 2

19:00 UTC

PIDs for software - shedding some light on a dark puzzle
The overwhelming majority of software source code is developed and used outside the academic world, in industry and in developer communities. As a consequence, software in general is either not formally identified or referenced at all, or is identified and referenced through methods that are totally different from the ones typically used in scholarly publications.

In this session we will provide an overview of the current practices of software identification, including use cases and identifier schemes from different academic domains and in industry to show the complexe puzzle of identifying software.

During the session we will propose ideas for better identification of research software and ask for the help of the audience to estimate their impact and move forward in community adoption.

Moderators
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library - CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)

Speakers
avatar for Morane Gruenpeter

Morane Gruenpeter

Software Heritage
avatar for Daniel S. Katz

Daniel S. Katz

Chief Scientist, NCSA, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Dan is Chief Scientist at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Research Associate Professor in Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and the School of Information Sciences (iSchool), at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. In past... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 19:00 - 19:30 UTC
Stage 1

19:00 UTC

El abecedario de ROR: Identificadores abiertos para las afiliaciones institucionales
Los identificadores del ROR (Research Organization Registry / Registro de Organizaciones de Investigación), son un componente principal de la infraestructura abierta. Los ROR IDs ya existen en varias sistemas para identificar las afiliaciones institucionales. Puesto que el proyecto de ROR aún está joven, se necesita comunicar a los usuarios e nteresados potenciales más información sobre qué es ROR y cómo se usa. En esta presentación de "PIDs 101," vamos a explicar lo que es (y no es) un "ROR ID," cuál es la relación entre ROR y otros identificadores como DOI y ORCID, y como se puede buscar en el registro, manipular (de manera básica) el ROR API, proponer que el registro haga cambios, integrar los ROR IDs en sistemas de investigación.

--
Research Organization Registry (ROR) IDs are a key component of open and interoperable research infrastructure and are already being integrated in many systems to collect and disambiguate affiliation data. However, as ROR is relatively new, many current and potential stakeholders could still benefit from learning the basics about what ROR is trying to do and how ROR IDs can be used. This PIDs 101 session on ROR will provide audience members with clear and helpful guidance on what a ROR ID is (and what it is not), how to look up organizations in ROR, how to run basic API queries in ROR, how to make suggestions for changes to ROR, how to implement ROR in research systems, and how ROR relates to other identifiers like DOIs and ORCID.

Moderators
avatar for Ana Cardoso

Ana Cardoso

ORCID
Engagement Lead, Central America, Puerto Rico, Caribbean, Technology & Service Providers across the Americas

Speakers
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager, California Digital Library


Wednesday January 27, 2021 19:00 - 19:30 UTC
Stage 3

19:30 UTC

PARTY TIME
It's a PID PARTY! Anything is possible! 

Wednesday January 27, 2021 19:30 - 20:00 UTC
Stage 1

20:00 UTC

Jeo-PID-y!
How well do you know your PIDs? How fast can you identify an identifier? Test your PID nerdiness in this virtual game of Jeopardy - where you answer a question by asking one - now with a fresh and zingy PID-flavoured twist! If it sounds confusing, don’t worry, our hostess with the mostess, Suze Kundu will explain all as she guides us through a series of Jeopardy-inspired questions to determine who is the PID champion of the world!

Speakers
avatar for Rachael Lammey

Rachael Lammey

Head of Special Programs, Crossref
avatar for Matthew Buys

Matthew Buys

Executive Director, DataCite
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager, California Digital Library
avatar for Paul Vierkant

Paul Vierkant

Outreach Manager, DataCite
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4448-3844
avatar for Gabriela Mejias

Gabriela Mejias

Engagement Manager, ORCID
NISO Plus 2020 Scholarship Awardee
avatar for Suze Kundu

Suze Kundu

Head of Public Engagement, Digital Science
A nanochemist with a passion for public engagement, I've been at Digital Science since 2018, having left lab life behind to help support a more open and efficient research community.


Wednesday January 27, 2021 20:00 - 20:30 UTC
Stage 1

20:30 UTC

Panel Best of PIDapalooza
Notable keynote speakers from PIDapaloozas of the past reunite to share their thoughts on where we have come from and where we are going in this wide world of PIDs.

Moderators
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director of Community Engagement, NISO

Speakers
avatar for Carly Strasser

Carly Strasser

Program Manager, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative
avatar for Gareth Murphy

Gareth Murphy

Data Steward, Novo Nordisk
Gareth is a Data Steward at Novo Nordisk . Previously, he was a software developer at DTU Space, and postdoctoral researcher at Niels Bohr International Academy, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, and Institute de Planetologie et Astrophysique... Read More →
avatar for Kathryn Kaiser

Kathryn Kaiser

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama @ Birmingham
I am working towards making the scientific record a fully integrated, relational database that makes research permanently findable! These days, I can always be found working in Birmingham (guess which one!) 33.516136449924076, -86.77198727305536
avatar for Melissa Haendel

Melissa Haendel

Associate Professor, Oregon State University
Melissa Haendel is the Director of the Center for Data to Health (CD2H) at Oregon Health & Science University, and the Director of Translational Data Science at Oregon State University. Her background is molecular genetics and developmental biology as well as translational informatics... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 20:30 - 21:00 UTC
Stage 1

21:00 UTC

How Many Rare Diseases Are There? How Good Identifier Provisioning Can Help Answer This Question
Moderators
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director of Community Engagement, NISO

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Haendel

Melissa Haendel

Associate Professor, Oregon State University
Melissa Haendel is the Director of the Center for Data to Health (CD2H) at Oregon Health & Science University, and the Director of Translational Data Science at Oregon State University. Her background is molecular genetics and developmental biology as well as translational informatics... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 21:00 - 21:30 UTC
Stage 1

21:30 UTC

The Making of an ORCID Consortium – Launching the US Government ORCID Consortium
In late 2018, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) embarked on the adventure of developing a new ORCID consortium. There were many factors and decision points to consider – what organizations could join the consortium, how the consortium should operate, staffing resources, consortium fee models, and much more. DOE OSTI wanted to develop a consortium to share best practices, API integration ideas, discuss barriers, raise ORCID awareness, and identify potential collaborations while decreasing membership costs and streamlining administrative and technical support. We wanted to offer ORCID consortium membership to help our organizations disambiguate researchers, track research outputs and awards, highlight facility use, auto-populate information collection in proposals, and facilitate connections between a researcher, their funding, facility use, and research outputs. It took a year and a half before the consortium was launched April 1st, 2020. The US Government ORCID Consortium now has 9 member organizations and counting. This session will walk through our consortium development process and ask what you might consider during the development of own consortium, whether it’s an ORCID consortium or another PID consortium.

Moderators
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager, California Digital Library

Speakers
avatar for Carly Robinson

Carly Robinson

Assistant Director for Information Products and Services, US Department of Energy
Carly Robinson is the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) Assistant Director for Information Products and Services. The Office of Information Products and Services (IPS) focuses on the dissemination of DOE-funded research and development... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 21:30 - 22:00 UTC
Stage 1

21:30 UTC

Party Principles, PID Principles, ISO Principles
We all know what it means to say we're having a dance party, right? Do we all know what we mean we we say PIDs should be persistent? Are we all in agreement that PIDs shouldn't contain semantics in the identifier?

In early 2021, ISO will be publishing a Technical Report on Principles of Identification. This session will focus on how to build the perfect PID using the Optimal Characteristics of Identifier Systems: OPTI[PIDa]MUS PID.
Participants are encouraged to make your own origami Optimus Prime.  Follow the instructions using this YouTube Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ll5cKV6ZM08  (Note you may want to mute the soundtrack!)

Moderators
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library - CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491


Wednesday January 27, 2021 21:30 - 22:00 UTC
Stage 2

22:00 UTC

A no-nonsense, PIDtastic guide to implementing effective data practices
Data curation, discovery, reuse, and citation are accelerating scholarship across diverse fields and disciplines, but fall far short of the potential. Stakeholders across campuses are asked to “do better” at managing research data outputs. Often this comes with jargon-filled mandates that are difficult to translate into concrete action. In the summer of 2019, NSF published a clear, concrete call to action for researchers in a Dear Colleague Letter. In an effort to amplify that call and offer clarity to campus stakeholders, ARL, AAU, APLU, and CDL partnered to convene 40 experts in order to create clear, actionable, easy-to-understand guidance.The resulting report Implementing Effective Data Practices: Stakeholder recommendations for collaborative research support was recently released.

This report provides specific recommendations for adopting and implementing persistent identifiers and supporting machine readable data management plans across an institution and within an organization or technology platform. It also provides key considerations for funders in adopting and requiring these critical infrastructure components. While the adoption and implementation of these best practices may be straightforward for some, communication about the importance of this infrastructure and the ease with which it may be implemented is needed.

To support institutional and organizational efforts in the adoption of this infrastructure, the project team has developed a communication toolkit that includes various slide decks and talking points. This presentation will introduce these key areas and provide attendees with an introduction to toolkit and how they can leverage it to promote adoption of persistent identifiers for various stakeholders.

Moderators
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library - CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)

Speakers
avatar for Maria Praetzellis

Maria Praetzellis

Maria is Product Manager for CDL’s research data management initiatives including DMPTool, the FAIR Island Project, and the NSF-funded machine-actionable DMP grant project.
avatar for Judy Ruttenberg

Judy Ruttenberg

Program Director for Strategic Initiatives, Association of Research Libraries
Judy Ruttenberg is primarily responsible for managing the SHARE initiative, which is building a free, open, data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle. While at ARL, Judy has also directed the Transforming Research Libraries initiative, which included... Read More →
CH

Cynthia Hudson Vitale

Director, Scholars and Scholarship, Association of Research Libraries


Wednesday January 27, 2021 22:00 - 22:30 UTC
Stage 2

22:00 UTC

Growing up: The next phase for IGSN
IGSN has been instrumental (get it?) in driving community support for sample PIDs, through thought leadership and an innovative technical approach.

Over the last year, the IGSN 2040 Project has engaged community members on a scaling strategy to ensure ongoing sample PID service provision. Join this session to get a taste of the strategic planning process, learn more about IGSN priorities and plans, and contribute your ideas to IGSN’s growing up and into its next stage!

Moderators
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager, California Digital Library

Speakers
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

President, IGSN e.V.
Kerstin Lehnert is Doherty Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance that operates EarthChem, the System for Earth Sample Registration, and the Astromaterials Data System. Kerstin... Read More →
SR

Sarah Ramdeen

Data Curator, Columbia University
avatar for Laure Haak

Laure Haak

I care about effective infrastructures for supporting open research, scholarship, and innovation. Talk to me about persistent identifiers, researcher involvement in managing their own information, ensuring credit for a wide range of contributions, and privacy. Or the Packers. Or piano... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 22:00 - 22:30 UTC
Stage 1

22:30 UTC

Embrace extinction or die trying 
Our raPID embrace of digital technology has created an incredibly fertile ground for innovations and transformations across the research world, from exascale data to the digital humanities. The novelty and potential of this new environment has prompted the creation of new kinds of entities, and many variations in the ways we identify them. This fertile, rapidly evolving context is analogous to the proliferation of new life during the Cambrian Explosion. 541 million years ago, the ancestors of most modern life forms sprang into being, evolving to occupy countless niches in the prehistoric ecosystem. The current PID landscape has many similar ‘niche dwellers’ - PIDs that have been developed to meet the needs of specific communities,disciplinary practices and leverage new technologies. As we hear more calls for simplification of the landscape, and consolidation around a few (or sometimes just one) PID system, why not embrace diversity instead? Consider: which of the Cambrian species could have predicted how evolution would progress? As practices evolve and consolidate, and technology shifts, some PID systems may well die out. That’s not necessarily a problem - as long as the information they hold can still be used by future generations.That said, having established the essential role of diversity we also investigate if it is also possible to sometimes have too much of a good thing… If you can only survive under very specific conditions and can’t interact with anything outside your niche, maybe you’ve stumbled into an evolutionary dead end?

We invite you to join us on a journey through the raPID evolution of PIDs, and ask why would we seek to narrow our field of innovation at this critical moment in PID evolution? Instead, we would argue that we should embrace diversity instead - while designing for extinction.

Moderators
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library - CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)

Speakers
JB

Josh Brown

MoreBrains Cooperative
avatar for Adrian Burton

Adrian Burton

Director of Services, Policy, Collections, ARDC - Australian Research Data Commons
Adrian Burton is Director of Services, Policy, Collections with the Australian Research Data Commons, and has many years experience building and supporting national data policy, infrastructure, and services.
avatar for Natasha Simons

Natasha Simons

Associate Director, Data & Services, Australian Research Data Commons
Natasha Simons has her head in the clouds - literally, technically and figuratively. She loves research data and making good stuff happen. As Associate Director, Data & Services, at the Australian Research Data Commons she is responsible for programs that support the development of... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 22:30 - 23:00 UTC
Stage 2

23:00 UTC

Nailed It! - PID Edition
A green circle? Colorful overlapping strips? Blue and Black swooshes? Do you know your PID-ful icons?

In this picture version of the popular Netflix series, Nailed It! you will work as a team to recreate your team’s digital masterpiece before the clock runs out. Each team is put into a breakout room and is given a PID provider or standard logo to recreate in pixelated form. When the time is up, all teams are brought back to the main session to reveal their creation. Bonus points for identifying whose logo it is. Don’t forget to proudly announce that you “Nailed It!”

Moderators
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491

Speakers
avatar for Laura Paglione

Laura Paglione

Spherical Cow Group
I have been actively building diverse communities for the past 10 years. Most recently my community building work has been centered on developing intentionally diverse, volunteer-based communities for global standards that consider what voices are missing from critical conversations... Read More →


Wednesday January 27, 2021 23:00 - 23:30 UTC
Stage 2

23:00 UTC

Extending ROR - Wag the Lion
In order to fully embrace ROR, we believe it is necessary to provide an extension that will allow institutional identifiers to be broken up into department-level units. This desire has been shared by funding agencies, publishers and organizations alike. Inspired in part by ARKs (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archival_Resource_Key) we envision qualifying tails on ROR ids, that allow sub-organization identifiers, and a common schema where we can make sense of these relations.

We created a tool kit prototype to expand ROR ids to departments. A template spreadsheet, in which organizations can populate parents and children of their sub-organizations, guides metadata creation. A script then transforms the tabular data into linked data, in line with the format of the ROR source. The schema includes links and controlled vocabularies to describe the subject of study of the department. Participants will be able to test the template on their institutions by describing a department of their choice and creating linked data based on their input.

We still have many questions; what the best data model would be, identifying fields of research; managing authority; and documenting change.

The challenges that we need to solve is how to make the datasets available and how to curate them. We want to solicit feedback on several proposals, including using a centralized GitHub repository or using WikiData.
Implementing departmental extensions requires buy-in both from ROR, who need to expand the data schema, and from the community, since they are the ones most familiar with their institutions. Our solution is technological, and it is now in the hands of the community to breathe life into it.

Moderators
avatar for Liz Krznarich

Liz Krznarich

Adoption Manager, DataCite/ROR

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Grant

Carolyn Grant

Astrophysics Data System
I have been working at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics for over thirty years and have been programming for the ADS Abstract Service since its inception in 1992. I originally began working at CfA while an undergraduate at Harvard College and liked it so much I never... Read More →
avatar for Arthur Smith

Arthur Smith

American Physical Society
Arthur Smith has worked for the American Physical Society in the JournalInformation Systems Department since 1995, supporting the onlinetransformation of the peer review process and related activities for thePhysical Review journals. His current position as lead data analyst involvescollecting... Read More →
avatar for Quinn Hart

Quinn Hart

Digital Applications Manager, University of California, Davis


Wednesday January 27, 2021 23:00 - 23:30 UTC
Stage 1

23:30 UTC

Never Have I Ever... URLapalooza Edition!
Put your knowledge of URLs to the test, and join us for a giant game of "Never Have I Ever" set up as an interactive quiz!

Until PIDs become the default, we must ensure that PIDless entities can still be linked with the PID graph. Can all URLs fill that void? We'll quiz you on the marvels and pitfalls of sharing and citing URLs that might or might not be PIDs. Don't be shy, we all copy-paste URLs from the address bar of our browsers...

Moderators
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491

Speakers
avatar for Luc Boruta

Luc Boruta

Director of Research, Thunken


Wednesday January 27, 2021 23:30 - Thursday January 28, 2021 00:00 UTC
Stage 2

23:30 UTC

GUIDs in GLAMs: Smithsonian Embraces Different PIDs for Different Entities
Smithsonian Institution has danced around identifiers in the various units and departments that make up the largest research/museum complex. But when we got the green light to go open access, the dance steps got more complicated. Staff across the Institution came together for a beautifully choreographed performance. Smithsonian leaped into the arms of GUIDs and now uses ARKs, DOIs, RORs, and maybe a few others. Yes, we had a few missteps, still missing a few moves, and maybe a toe or two were stepped on but we are proud of our show.

Moderators
avatar for Liz Krznarich

Liz Krznarich

Adoption Manager, DataCite/ROR

Speakers
BM

Bess Missell

Metadata Librarian, Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
avatar for Suzanne Pilsk

Suzanne Pilsk

Head, Metadata Dept, Smithsonian
RS

Rebecca Snyder

Smithsonian Institution - National Museum of Natural History


Wednesday January 27, 2021 23:30 - Thursday January 28, 2021 00:00 UTC
Stage 1
 
Thursday, January 28
 

00:00 UTC

Wikidata: Persistent identifiers as the basis for multilingual and human-machine collaboration
Bring some words or phrases that you find interesting, in a language that you can type into an etherpad or speak into your computer's microphone. Feel free to sing them too! Then let's explore them together and see how they are related to meanings or to words and phrases in other languages, and at what points in that network of interactions the introduction of persistent identifiers would be beneficial.

The session's etherpad sits at https://etherpad.wikimedia.org/p/zenodo.4253308 and further materials related to the session shall be available via https://10.5281/zenodo.4253308 when the session starts.

Moderators
avatar for Liz Krznarich

Liz Krznarich

Adoption Manager, DataCite/ROR

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Mietchen

Daniel Mietchen

Researcher, School of Data Science, University of Virginia
- Integrating research workflows with the Web - Engaging the research community and the public with open research workflows - Using open research workflows in educational contexts


Thursday January 28, 2021 00:00 - 00:30 UTC
Stage 1

00:00 UTC

Hey, we didn’t publish that! Unresolving PIDs in the wild and how to catch them
One of the key functions of PIDs is to make links to resources permanent and reliable. PIDs, and particularly DOIs, that do not resolve are therefore individually a nuisance and collectively a significant issue for the PID ecosystem as they undermine trust in its reliability.

We will describe how the Qualitative Data Repository, QDR, has found examples of links to datasets on its site, both as URLs and as DOIs on multiple occasions, We will discuss two automated monitoring strategies that we have implemented in reaction to these discoveries: One based on Datacite’s automated reports, the other based on our own server logs.

We will invite the audience to describe their own experience both with encountering broken PIDs and their efforts to fix and prevent them and catalog some most common causes and brainstorm fixes. Finally, while we are talking about broken PIDs, we will lead all participants in a chant of “Shame, JSTOR, Shame” for their continued publication of broken DOIs (see https://twitter.com/adam42smith/status/1299503139767414786 ).

Moderators
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491

Speakers
avatar for Nicholas Weber

Nicholas Weber

Assistant Professor, University of Washington
Nic Weber is an assistant professor at the University of Washington's iSchool and the Technical Director of the Qualitative Data Repository, hosted by the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. His research focus on sustainability from a systems-thinking perspective. He is broadly interested in the idea of commons governance, and the use of public sector information (open data) for so... Read More →
avatar for Sebastian Karcher

Sebastian Karcher

Associate Director, Qualitative Data Repository
Qualitative data, data sharing, data citations, Zotero.Presentation slides: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.9989012.v1
avatar for Jim Myers

Jim Myers

Software Designer/Developer, self-employed


Thursday January 28, 2021 00:00 - 00:30 UTC
Stage 2

00:30 UTC

PKP and PIDs: An Epic Poem
PIDs promise to link together all the scholarly people, places and things, but anyone that has tried working with a scholarly dataset knows that records are always incomplete, data lacks normalization, and duplicates inevitably creep in. In the face of these issues, it is tempting to select a single PID for each type of entity and to centralize the collection and management of the PID's metadata. While this simplifies building tools and services, it also serves to constrain what and whose scholarship, research, and knowledge are counted as part of the scholarly record. In this lengthy poem, Dr. Alperin will describe how the Public Knowledge Project has worked to support DOIs, ORCIDs, and ROR, while ensuring that our software is not tied to any one PID. Doing so has been our way of walking the fine line of linking the scholarly record while continuing to support the diversity that exists in the research community.

After hearing the PKP and PIDs Epic Poem, the audience will be invited to submit their Poems, Limericks, and Haiku's about PIDs, and even to come on stage and read their creations to the audience.
ACTION ITEM: Try your hand at writing a PID-themed poem! Or ask your questions for me in Poem form! Get ready to put your poem in the chat, or ask to come on stage to read it!

Moderators
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager, California Digital Library

Speakers
avatar for Juan Pablo Alperin

Juan Pablo Alperin

Associate Director, Public Knowledge Project
Juan Pablo Alperin is an Assistant Professor at the School of Publishing at Simon Fraser University, the Associate Director of Research for the Public Knowledge Project, and the co-director of the Scholarly Communications Lab. He is a multi-disciplinary scholar, with training in computer... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 00:30 - 01:00 UTC
Stage 1

01:00 UTC

Deep Linking: Machine learning to connect up the PIDs
Deep Linking: Machine learning to connect up the PIDs

Science is progressive, and every discovery, set of data, and publication builds on previous work. Today, it's impossible to put every new development in the context of what's gone before, especially if research outputs are largely invisible living all over the web disconnected to each other. Meta aims to remove this barrier to scientific progress with its graph of biomedical research connecting up PIDs across "people, places, things." We apply machine learning to the scientific literature as a way to get retrieve more connections between these essential elements. During this session, we will share the work we've done, lessons we're learning, and open up the remaining time as a group discussion on best practices, pitfalls, areas of opportunity.

Moderators
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager, California Digital Library

Speakers
avatar for Alex Wade

Alex Wade

Technical Program Manager, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative
AI

Ana-Maria Istrate

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative
JL

Jennifer Lin

Product Dir of Meta, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative


Thursday January 28, 2021 01:00 - 01:30 UTC
Stage 1

01:30 UTC

Introduction to PIDapalooza - PARTY TIME
Learn more about PIDapalooza.  All the info you need to enjoy the conference.  It's a PID PARTY! Anything is possible!

Moderators
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager, California Digital Library

Speakers
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library - CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)
avatar for Natasha Simons

Natasha Simons

Associate Director, Data & Services, Australian Research Data Commons
Natasha Simons has her head in the clouds - literally, technically and figuratively. She loves research data and making good stuff happen. As Associate Director, Data & Services, at the Australian Research Data Commons she is responsible for programs that support the development of... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 01:30 - 02:00 UTC
Stage 1

02:00 UTC

中文講述 - 永續標識符完全攻略
無論是剛接觸永續標識符的你,或者是想進一步了解更多的你,都適合參加這場宴會!本次講述將介紹永續標識符的用途和價值,分享關鍵永續標識符的訊息及知識。具有專業素養和熱忱的講者期待和你們的問答互動!

Speakers
avatar for Estelle Cheng

Estelle Cheng

Engagement Manager, Global Direct Members, ORCID
Based in Taiwan, Estelle works collaboratively with partners, stakeholders and service providers to promote adoption of ORCID and to improve their use of ORCID. Before joining ORCID, Estelle served as the product manager for digital object identifier (DOI) at Airiti


Thursday January 28, 2021 02:00 - 02:30 UTC
Stage 3

02:00 UTC

English - PIDs for Beginners
Whether you are new to the world of persistent identifiers or just in need of a basic PID refresher, this introductory session is for you! We’ll explain what a persistent identifier is, what they can do, and why they’re important; and we’ll share information about some key PIDs. Our knowledgeable and enthusiastic speaker will answer your questions, and provide you with the information you need to be a PID person yourself!

Speakers
avatar for Siobhann McCafferty

Siobhann McCafferty

ARDC
Made in Aotearoa/New Zealand, matured in Scotland and currently Brisbane based in Australia.Project Manager for the Australian Research Data Commons, wrangler of RAiD and all round  PID enthusiast.
avatar for Natasha Simons

Natasha Simons

Associate Director, Data & Services, Australian Research Data Commons
Natasha Simons has her head in the clouds - literally, technically and figuratively. She loves research data and making good stuff happen. As Associate Director, Data & Services, at the Australian Research Data Commons she is responsible for programs that support the development of... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 02:00 - 02:30 UTC
Stage 1

02:30 UTC

ISNI标准化和实证研究
The Session will present practical explorations for the standardization process of ISNI and introduce application researches for knowledge ID (KID), which is a new method to track authors’ research impact from more perspective.

Moderators
avatar for Estelle Cheng

Estelle Cheng

Engagement Manager, Global Direct Members, ORCID
Based in Taiwan, Estelle works collaboratively with partners, stakeholders and service providers to promote adoption of ORCID and to improve their use of ORCID. Before joining ORCID, Estelle served as the product manager for digital object identifier (DOI) at Airiti

Speakers

Thursday January 28, 2021 02:30 - 03:00 UTC
Stage 3

02:30 UTC

Entity Explosion - navigate the web with PIDs
Wikidata is great for asking weird questions like "Who is the most famous child of a librarian?" (the answer will surprise you). But what use are all the external identifiers that make up 90% of the database? I'll show you how to use them to navigate the web.

Say you're on a webpage about a particular thing ("entity"). Click on the browser extension Entity Explosion to get information about that entity (from the URL alone!), and an explosion of links to other sites about that same entity. The data provided is sourced live from Wikidata - the Rosetta Stone of the internet - and can be retrieved in any language.

We'll browse around some topics of your choice, to see how powerful you can be with a pinch of Wikidata added to your browser.

Speakers
avatar for Siobhann McCafferty

Siobhann McCafferty

ARDC
Made in Aotearoa/New Zealand, matured in Scotland and currently Brisbane based in Australia.Project Manager for the Australian Research Data Commons, wrangler of RAiD and all round  PID enthusiast.
avatar for Toby Hudson

Toby Hudson

University of Sydney
My lockdown project: Entity Explosion - a browser extension that allows you to discover links and information about the same topic on other sites.I'm an academic at the School of Chemistry, University of Sydney. My research involves computer simulation of crystals and liquids.I've... Read More →



Thursday January 28, 2021 02:30 - 03:00 UTC
Stage 1

03:00 UTC

DOI作为促进研究的基础建设
This session will introduce the global development of DOI, and how DOI facilitates the research in China. It will also discuss the collaboration of DOI and other PIDs as the key research infrastructure.

Moderators
avatar for Estelle Cheng

Estelle Cheng

Engagement Manager, Global Direct Members, ORCID
Based in Taiwan, Estelle works collaboratively with partners, stakeholders and service providers to promote adoption of ORCID and to improve their use of ORCID. Before joining ORCID, Estelle served as the product manager for digital object identifier (DOI) at Airiti

Speakers
XG

Xiaofeng Guo

Wanfang Data


Thursday January 28, 2021 03:00 - 03:30 UTC
Stage 3

03:00 UTC

The ABCs of ROR: Understanding and Using Open Identifiers for Affiliations
Research Organization Registry (ROR) IDs are a key component of open and interoperable research infrastructure and are already being integrated in many systems to collect and disambiguate affiliation data. However, as ROR is relatively new, many current and potential stakeholders could still benefit from learning the basics about what ROR is trying to do and how ROR IDs can be used. This PIDs 101 session on ROR will provide audience members with clear and helpful guidance on what a ROR ID is (and what it is not), how to look up organizations in ROR, how to run basic API queries in ROR, how to make suggestions for changes to ROR, how to implement ROR in research systems, and how ROR relates to other identifiers like DOIs and ORCID.

Speakers
avatar for Siobhann McCafferty

Siobhann McCafferty

ARDC
Made in Aotearoa/New Zealand, matured in Scotland and currently Brisbane based in Australia.Project Manager for the Australian Research Data Commons, wrangler of RAiD and all round  PID enthusiast.
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager, California Digital Library


Thursday January 28, 2021 03:00 - 03:30 UTC
Stage 1

03:30 UTC

CSTR(中国科技资源标识)于中国科学院国家空间科学中心的应用实践
Persistent identifiers (PIDs) play an important role in scientific data management, especially in data publication and citation to support the findability and accessibility of scientific data. Data organizations and institutions in China are increasingly aware of PIDs as required for implementation of the FAIR principles, and as a result, many good practices have been developed. It is worth noting that China has also established a persistent identifier, namely the China Science & Technology Resource identifier (CSTR). In my session I will share a typical case of National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) embedding four types of PIDs into its workflows, exemplifying the application of PIDs in scientific data management in China. In these four types, I will emphasize the case of CSTR.

Moderators
avatar for Estelle Cheng

Estelle Cheng

Engagement Manager, Global Direct Members, ORCID
Based in Taiwan, Estelle works collaboratively with partners, stakeholders and service providers to promote adoption of ORCID and to improve their use of ORCID. Before joining ORCID, Estelle served as the product manager for digital object identifier (DOI) at Airiti

Speakers
YY

Yaqin Yuan

National Space Science Center of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)


Thursday January 28, 2021 03:30 - 04:00 UTC
Stage 3

03:30 UTC

PID adoption by jerks and creeps
Scholarly research advances by making, evaluating and building-on attributable “assertions”.

The most comprehensive way to register research assertions is by publishing articles in peer review journals. This “jerky” approach remains the gold standard for research progress.

However, traditional forms of publication can now be supplemented with more dynamic and nimble approaches that are based on the “creepy” publication of granular assertions. Such assertions are equally attributable but offer significant advantages in terms of speed, cost, and flexibility.

In this session we’ll discuss the relationship between PIDs and assertions, and explore how they can be deployed by jerks and creeps. Learn how the emerging PID infrastructure enables a more incremental and granular approach.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Wynne

Richard Wynne

Founder, Rescognito
The founder and leader of rescognito a free service for recognizing and promoting good research citizenship. Rescognito is built on ORCIDs and allows organizations to reward contributors with ‘Cogs’, the currency of recognition in the research world. ESIP is working with Rescognito to recognize contributions to... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 03:30 - 04:00 UTC
Stage 1

04:00 UTC

COVID-19 Collaboration Network using PID-graph
Due to the global pandemic, the focus of most researchers around the world has changed to COVID-19 impact and recovery. In our work, we leverage the power of ORCID and other persistent identifiers to form a connected graph of scholarly communications to understand how organisations and countries are collaborating towards finding a pathway to COVID-19 recovery.

Persistent identifiers (PIDs) allow us to link different entities like people, organisations, datasets and publications by precisely identifying the participants within a research project. PIDs enable research provenance and attribution by accurately linking research entities. Our work uses persistent identifiers like ORCID IDs, DoI’s and org ids (organisational identifiers) to establish connections such as
DoI, PMID -> ORCID-> ORG ID (ISNI, GRID, ROR)

We leverage the interconnectedness of these different identifiers to report on the formation of a collaboration network that captures connections between researchers, research datasets, publications and grants. Using this newly formed collaboration network, we demonstrate how COVID-19 research collaboration has formed since late 2019.

Our work is an example of how persistent identifiers when implemented and used within the research ecosystem can be applied to understand real world scenarios.

Speakers
MA

Melroy Almeida

Systems Analyst, Australian Access Federation
avatar for Amir Aryani

Amir Aryani

Swinburne University of Technology


Thursday January 28, 2021 04:00 - 04:30 UTC
Stage 1

04:30 UTC

PARTY TIME
It's a PID PARTY! Anything is possible!

Thursday January 28, 2021 04:30 - 05:00 UTC
Stage 1

05:00 UTC

日本語 - PID101 ビギナーズガイド:永続的識別子
永続的識別子(PID)について全く知らない人、あるいはPIDの基本について復習したい人のためのビギナーズガイドです。このセッションでは、PIDとは何か、何の役に立つのか、なぜ重要なのかについて解説し、いくつかの重要なPIDについて詳しく紹介します。PIDをよく知る専門家に質問して、あなたも今日からPIDの世界に仲間入りしましょう!


Speakers
avatar for Nobuko Miyairi

Nobuko Miyairi

Scholarly Communications Consultant, Independent
Nobuko Miyairi is a freelance consultant/analyst, based in Tokyo, Japan. She provides strategic consulting for new business development and start-up in STM publishing and scholarly communications. Nobuko also serves as Lecturer, University of Tsukuba, Japan; Invited Expert, National... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 05:00 - 05:30 UTC
Stage 3

05:00 UTC

Development of a Patterns in research information management using the of persistent identifiers: findings from a National survey in Ukraine
In order to examine how research institutions in Ukraine are applying research information management practices, The State Scientific and Technical Library of Ukraine with Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine to conduct a web-based survey that was administered from September 2020 through November 2020, yielding 1200 responses from 80 institutions of higher education, demonstrating the national nature of research information management activities.

Survey results details the complexity of research information management practices and examines how not commercial and open-source platforms are becoming widely implemented across regions, coexisting with a large number of region-specific solutions as well as locally developed systems.

It also considers the urgent need for system-to-system interoperability - with both internal and external systems - and demonstrates how the use of identifiers, standards, and protocols are perceived as most valuable when they can also facilitate interoperability.

The growing need for improved interoperability between managing open access workflows and the curation of institutional research outputs metadata is giving rise to the increasing functional merging of research information management systems and institutional repositories and further reinforcing the need for complex, cross-stakeholder teams to support institutional RIM activities, commonly featuring research institutions, and increasingly, the library.

Speakers
avatar for Serhii Zharinov

Serhii Zharinov

THE STATE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL LIBRARY OF UKRAINE
avatar for Sabina Augunas

Sabina Augunas

THE STATE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL LIBRARY OF UKRAINE



Thursday January 28, 2021 05:00 - 05:30 UTC
Stage 2

05:30 UTC

みんなが知りたい!ORCID
ORCIDは、Open Researcher & Contributor IDの略で、研究に携わるあらゆる人々の業績や貢献を記録できるオープンレジストリです。ORCIDは誰でも無料で取得でき、最近では学術ジャーナルへの投稿などの際に要求されることが多くなっています。ORCIDはそもそもどんなもので、誰が管理していて、何の役に立つのでしょうか?このセッションではORCIDの基本をクイズ形式で学びます。


Speakers
avatar for Masao Mori

Masao Mori

Professor, Tokyo Institute of Technology
Masao Mori is a professor at Tokyo Institute of Technology since 2015. He received PhD of informatics from Graduate School of Information Science and Electric Engineering at Kyushu University in 2011. He has been   the conference chair of International Conference on Data Science... Read More →
avatar for Nobuhiro Yabuki

Nobuhiro Yabuki

Associate Professor, Yokohama National University
Associate Professor, Office of Institutional Research and Decision Support / Research Administrator, Research Initiatives and Promotion Organization, Yokohama National University. He accomplished credits for the doctoral program in International Political Economy, Graduate School... Read More →
avatar for Nobuko Miyairi

Nobuko Miyairi

Scholarly Communications Consultant, Independent
Nobuko Miyairi is a freelance consultant/analyst, based in Tokyo, Japan. She provides strategic consulting for new business development and start-up in STM publishing and scholarly communications. Nobuko also serves as Lecturer, University of Tsukuba, Japan; Invited Expert, National... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 05:30 - 06:00 UTC
Stage 3

05:30 UTC

Maturity Model for PIDs - Is it too soon? A case study by the Australian ORCID Consortium 
The Australian Research Community recognised the need for having a national approach to ORCID implementation in Australia and helped launch the Australian ORCID Consortium in 2016. Since its launch, the number of consortium members integrating with ORCID has increased steadily with 80% of members with at least one integration and a few with multiple system integrations. However, not all integrations are equal and even members who have the same vendor integration have implemented it differently. This makes it difficult for members to evaluate how well they have implemented ORCID at their institutions and have a unified approach towards maximising the benefits of their ORCID integrations.

To address this the consortium lead launched the ORCID Maturity Assessment survey where members could self-evaluate their ORCID integrations according to ORCID best practices and on completion of the survey receive a personalised report, tailored according to their answers. The report highlights areas they have done well, gaps for improvements and tips on how to maximise their benefits from their implementation.

We would like to discuss our methodology, present results from our maturity assessment survey and gather feedback from the PID community.. We would also like to have stimulated discussion about the feasibility of having a maturity model for different PIDs, so that organisations implementing them can better understand their implementation and also maximise their benefits. It would provide PID providers with a better understanding of how organisations with different PID maturity levels use PIDS and how they interconnect with each other.

Speakers
MA

Melroy Almeida

Systems Analyst, Australian Access Federation


Thursday January 28, 2021 05:30 - 06:00 UTC
Stage 2

05:30 UTC

RAiD integrations in the ARDC. Practicing what we Preach in PID-World (APAC)
In the spirit of practicing what we PID Preach, the ARDC recently integrated RAiDs with its Nectar Cloud allocation system and its partner project management system.

These two very different integrations use the same PID (RAiD) for a variety of reasons such as: encouraging FAIR data practices, increasing transparency, facilitating access and gathering metrics across the research activity.

This session will explain the drivers for integration, issues along the way, and the benefits of use for the ARDC and our project partners.

Speakers
avatar for Siobhann McCafferty

Siobhann McCafferty

ARDC
Made in Aotearoa/New Zealand, matured in Scotland and currently Brisbane based in Australia.Project Manager for the Australian Research Data Commons, wrangler of RAiD and all round  PID enthusiast.


Thursday January 28, 2021 05:30 - 06:00 UTC
Stage 1

06:00 UTC

ORCID日本コンソーシアム
2020年より、17機関が参加するORCIDの日本コンソーシアムが発足しました。研究に携わる誰もが無料で取得できるORCIDですが、研究機関や大学がORCIDメンバーとなってORCIDのシステム実装を進めることで、研究コミュニティ全体に大きなメリットがあります。このセッションでは、ORCID日本コンソーシアム成立の背景やメンバー機関の取り組みについてご紹介します。


Speakers
avatar for Nobuhiro Yabuki

Nobuhiro Yabuki

Associate Professor, Yokohama National University
Associate Professor, Office of Institutional Research and Decision Support / Research Administrator, Research Initiatives and Promotion Organization, Yokohama National University. He accomplished credits for the doctoral program in International Political Economy, Graduate School... Read More →
avatar for Masao Mori

Masao Mori

Professor, Tokyo Institute of Technology
Masao Mori is a professor at Tokyo Institute of Technology since 2015. He received PhD of informatics from Graduate School of Information Science and Electric Engineering at Kyushu University in 2011. He has been   the conference chair of International Conference on Data Science... Read More →
avatar for Nobuko Miyairi

Nobuko Miyairi

Scholarly Communications Consultant, Independent
Nobuko Miyairi is a freelance consultant/analyst, based in Tokyo, Japan. She provides strategic consulting for new business development and start-up in STM publishing and scholarly communications. Nobuko also serves as Lecturer, University of Tsukuba, Japan; Invited Expert, National... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 06:00 - 06:30 UTC
Stage 3

06:00 UTC

DOI Facilitate the Research as Infrastructure
This session will introduce the global development of DOI, and how DOI facilitates the research in China. It will also discuss the collaboration of DOI and other PIDs as the key research infrastructure.

Speakers
XG

Xiaofeng Guo

Wanfang Data


Thursday January 28, 2021 06:00 - 06:30 UTC
Stage 2

06:00 UTC

Name and describe your favourite collectible
What is your favourite collectible? What makes it unique and how would you describe it? In this session, we want to explore how physical specimens can be made first-class elements of open research infrastructures.

Speakers
avatar for Esther Plomp

Esther Plomp

Data Steward, Delft University of Technology
I support researchers with their data/code management. I'm happy to discuss anything Research Data Management related (data management plans, FAIR, data repositories), as well as other topics such as R, Preregistration, Registered Reports. My own background is in biological anthr... Read More →
avatar for Jens Klump

Jens Klump

Team Leader Geoscience Analytics, CSIRO
“The really exciting part is not about putting labels on things, but about what you can do when you put machine learning to work on the labelled data.” (https://www.auscope.org.au/posts/2020/12/18/introducing-jens).Vice President of the International Geo Sample Number Implementation... Read More →
avatar for Lesley Wyborn

Lesley Wyborn

Honorary Professor, Australian National University


Thursday January 28, 2021 06:00 - 06:30 UTC
Stage 1

06:30 UTC

National PID Infrastructure Strategy for Open Research: the view from down under
Australia (also known as “Down Under”) is often used by tech companies to test new technologies and products, since it is relatively affluent, cohesive, and manageable in size. Perhaps that makes it a good place to test national approaches to infrastructure that support open research, and the National Research Infrastructure Strategy has been a two decade experiment in applying leading edge technologies at national scale to support leading edge research.

The establishment in 2019 of the Australian Research Data Commons was the latest development in this 20 year strategy. The ARDC conducted a review of previous approaches to providing PID services and has issued a new PID policy, strategy, and portfolio of PID services. Come to this talk to hear why we think PIDs are essential to leading edge research, which PIDs we consider essential to the portfolio, and how we evolve our delivery.

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Simons

Natasha Simons

Associate Director, Data & Services, Australian Research Data Commons
Natasha Simons has her head in the clouds - literally, technically and figuratively. She loves research data and making good stuff happen. As Associate Director, Data & Services, at the Australian Research Data Commons she is responsible for programs that support the development of... Read More →
avatar for Adrian Burton

Adrian Burton

Director of Services, Policy, Collections, ARDC - Australian Research Data Commons
Adrian Burton is Director of Services, Policy, Collections with the Australian Research Data Commons, and has many years experience building and supporting national data policy, infrastructure, and services.


Thursday January 28, 2021 06:30 - 07:00 UTC
Stage 1

07:00 UTC

Persistent What? A Researcher's Confusion
For a long time, the proliferation of identifiers linked to one's research outputs or profile added to rather than reduced the research community's confusion. Having lived in China for close to a decade, at an early stage I was keenly aware of the need for name disambiguation among Asian scientific communities. Combined with my active editorial role of one of the main journals in my discipline, I soon took an interest in the development of PIDs, with particular emphasis on ORCID and Scopus IDs. Yet, even though I volunteered to promote ORCID as country ambassador and later joined the ORCID Board, the penny only dropped after my move to Australia in early 2018. PIDs have only recently become useful to me, because they are now mandated by the Australian Research Council in their grant application process. Nevertheless, I anticipate additional positive developments.

Moderators
avatar for Natasha Simons

Natasha Simons

Associate Director, Data & Services, Australian Research Data Commons
Natasha Simons has her head in the clouds - literally, technically and figuratively. She loves research data and making good stuff happen. As Associate Director, Data & Services, at the Australian Research Data Commons she is responsible for programs that support the development of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Richard de Grijs

Richard de Grijs

Macquarie University
Richard de Grijs obtained his PhD in Astrophysics from the University of Groningen (Netherlands) in 1997. He next held postdoctoral research positions at the Universities of Virginia (USA) and Cambridge (UK), before being appointed to a tenured post at the University of Sheffield... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 07:00 - 07:30 UTC
Stage 1

07:30 UTC

Animating Research Collaboration Network using PIDs, Neo4j and Gephi
Understanding the research collaboration networks is the key to studying how science community operates. What we learned in 2020, at the time of the pandemic, highlighted how such networks evolve and transform disjointed scientific activities to a global movement working on the COVID-19 and the path to recovery. In this presentation, we use Research Graph COVID-19 cluster to demonstrate how PIDs' metadata can be used to animate this collaboration network.
 
We will use ORCID and DOIs, and leverage the graph augmentation API to connected nodes and create a Neo4j graph database. The process is captured in an open source Jupyter Notebook, enabling anyone to replicate the same process and hopefully expand on this work. Furthermore, we demonstrate how the combination of Neo4j and Gephi can be a powerful graph analytics and visualisation toolbox.

Moderators
avatar for Natasha Simons

Natasha Simons

Associate Director, Data & Services, Australian Research Data Commons
Natasha Simons has her head in the clouds - literally, technically and figuratively. She loves research data and making good stuff happen. As Associate Director, Data & Services, at the Australian Research Data Commons she is responsible for programs that support the development of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Amir Aryani

Amir Aryani

Swinburne University of Technology


Thursday January 28, 2021 07:30 - 08:00 UTC
Stage 1

08:00 UTC

Retro-PIDs: making historic Platypus Infinitely Discoverable (PID)
The PID graph falls apart when it comes to legacy literature (pretty much everything pre-2000). The vast majority of historic publications lack DOIs. This means they sit outside the linked research infrastructure of modern publications, appearing in reference lists as unlinked citations (strings not things) or not at all, because they are too hard for authors to find and/or cite. The upshot of this is that our historic literature is falling into obscurity.

The same is true for historic researchers. ORCIDS must be self-administered, which means they cannot be assigned to dead people. This makes it impossible to connect and track the academic output of historic individuals (and their organisations) using ORCIDs, currently the only author identifier accepted by Crossref.

In 2020, the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) launched a global working group to tackle this issue — to bring the world's biodiversity heritage literature into the modern lined network of scholarly research. PIDs have the potential to make the historic literature infinitely more discoverable. But the old literature is a square peg; it doesn't fit comfortably into the shiny round hole of modern PIDs. This session will discuss the challenges, issues and solutions around retrospectively assigning PIDs to the old stuff (and will showcase the platypuses we've discovered along the way).

Moderators
avatar for Rachael Lammey

Rachael Lammey

Head of Special Programs, Crossref

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Kearney

Nicole Kearney

Manager, Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) Australia, Biodiversity Heritage Library, Australia
Zoologist and science communicator working to make Australia's biodiversity heritage literature openly accessible and discoverable for everyone. Manager of the Australian branch of the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL). Chair of the BHL's Global Persistent Identifier Working Group... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 08:00 - 08:30 UTC
Stage 1

08:30 UTC

Pre-competitive PIDs: the journey to FAIR data
In the wake of the pandemic crisis, findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR) data has become crucial in order to develop next generation medicines that will change the life of patients. At Novo Nordisk, the use of ontologies and persistent identifiers to uniquely identify datasets and complex scientific vocabularies is a key factor in the development of machine learning-driven analytics.  Developing ontologies from scratch is not necessary, instead, existing ontologies can be enriched with domain specific knowledge. FAIR assessment are a useful tool to plan strategies for improving reuse of data by R&D users. Curathons can be used to identify bottlenecks and anti-patterns in the data flow. Precompetitive collaborations such as the Allotrope Foundation can allow enterprise to unite their forces in harnessing scientific data to develop advanced new medicines

Moderators
avatar for Rachael Lammey

Rachael Lammey

Head of Special Programs, Crossref

Speakers
avatar for Gareth Murphy

Gareth Murphy

Data Steward, Novo Nordisk
Gareth is a Data Steward at Novo Nordisk . Previously, he was a software developer at DTU Space, and postdoctoral researcher at Niels Bohr International Academy, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, and Institute de Planetologie et Astrophysique... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 08:30 - 09:00 UTC
Stage 1

09:00 UTC

PIDapa-party-pooper: PIDs are a dead end; long live open infrastructure
As a community, we have started so many initiatives centered around the need for PIDs, or how PIDs should be connected or governed, that PIDs are presented as ends in themselves. As a co-founder of PIDapalooza, these were important discussions back in 2016. But the message simply has to move on. PIDs are pointless without accompanying metadata, assertions, relationships, and associated services - at a minimum, robust APIs for getting the metadata. By talking exclusively about PIDs, and “minting” PIDs, we have inadvertently imbued the identifier strings themselves with talismanic, magical properties - an elixir that cures all. We need to re-focus our attention and talk about how open scholarly infrastructure enables open research and human knowledge.

Moderators
avatar for Rachael Lammey

Rachael Lammey

Head of Special Programs, Crossref

Speakers
avatar for Ed Pentz

Ed Pentz

Executive Director, Crossref
Ed Pentz became Crossref's first Executive Director when the organization was founded in 2000 and manages all aspects of the organization to ensure that it fulfills its mission to make research outputs easy to find, cite, link and assess. Ed was Chair of the ORCID board of directors... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 09:00 - 09:30 UTC
Stage 1

09:30 UTC

Wikidata as a PID community
Wikidata is often referred to as a hub for persistent identifiers. In this session, it is postulated that Wikidata is actually a PID community working to gather and curate identifiers related to research activity. After a brief introduction to Wikidata, an overview of the PID coverage and mappings will be presented. Questions about Wikidata, in general, or related to a specific PID, will be invited before the session concludes with a discussion of potential opportunities for cooperation between the Wikidata community and other PID communities.

Moderators
avatar for Matthew Buys

Matthew Buys

Executive Director, DataCite

Speakers
avatar for Simon Cobb

Simon Cobb

Research Management System Administrator, University of Exeter


Thursday January 28, 2021 09:30 - 10:00 UTC
Stage 1

09:30 UTC

How to get heritage organisations to start using PIDs: a tale of two countries
Two countries, the UK and the Netherlands, are developing the use of PIDs in heritage organisations. Put your GLAM hat on while we share some findings of what the projects have found about the use of PIDs for heritage objects, the barriers, the benefits, and what is needed for these institutions to take the next step with PIDs.

Moderators
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement, DataCite

Speakers
avatar for Rachael Kotarski

Rachael Kotarski

Head of Research Infrastructure Services, British Library
FM

Frances Madden

Research Associate, British Library
Frances Madden is Research Identifiers Lead at The British Library, overseeing the BL's contribution to the FREYA project. Her role includes looking at integrating persistent identifiers into the BL's systems and representing the humanities and social sciences sectors within FREYA... Read More →
RV

Remco van Veenendaal

National Archives of the Netherlands


Thursday January 28, 2021 09:30 - 10:00 UTC
Stage 2

10:00 UTC

PIDs for Africa
AfricArXiv is a community-led digital archive for African research. We provide a platform for African scientists to upload their working papers, preprints, accepted manuscripts (post-prints), and published papers to partner platforms and services we work with such as ScienceOpen, Open Science Framework, Zenodo, Figshare and PubPub. We thereby provide options to link data and code, and for article versioning. We have set out to deploy all currently available persistent identifier systems (ORCID, ROR, DOI, etc.) to design a platform that is state of the art and most possible/feasible interoperable in serving the African scholarly community and aloow for fruitful collaborations on a global scale to occur.

Moderators
avatar for Matthew Buys

Matthew Buys

Executive Director, DataCite

Speakers

Thursday January 28, 2021 10:00 - 10:30 UTC
Stage 1

10:00 UTC

PID Clinic - Bring your PID ailments and we will try to fix them on the spot
Bring some words or phrases that you find interesting, in a language that you can type into an etherpad or speak into your computer's microphone. Feel free to sing them too! Then let's explore them together and see how they are related to meanings or to words and phrases in other languages, and at what points in that network of interactions the introduction of persistent identifiers would be beneficial.

The session's etherpad sits at https://etherpad.wikimedia.org/p/zenodo.4253308 . Further materials related to the session shall be available via https://10.5281/zenodo.4253308 when the session starts.

Moderators
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement, DataCite

Speakers
MF

Martin Fenner

Technical Director, DataCite


Thursday January 28, 2021 10:00 - 10:30 UTC
Stage 2

10:30 UTC

Better metadata makes a difference
In this session, you will drop in at the Metadata Do More zoom-athon to make your contribution to metadata activism and help metadata to make a difference.

In 2015, the United Nations General Assembly put forth 17 goals to “transform our world”. These goals aim to tackle the big, important problems facing society. Scholarly research is critical to ensuring our collective response is timely and enduring. Open metadata is the foundational infrastructure that fuels innovation and is key to ensuring that research can be available, relevant, and used by everyone who needs it.

Play your part, help us improve the quality of metadata for research. Metadata 2020 is a collaboration that advocates richer, connected, and reusable, open metadata for all research outputs, which will advance scholarly pursuits for the benefit of society.

Richer metadata fuels discovery and innovation. Connected metadata bridges the gaps between systems and communities. Reusable, open metadata eliminates duplication of effort. When we settle for inadequate metadata, none of this is possible and everyone suffers as a consequence.

Moderators
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement, DataCite

Speakers
avatar for Laura Paglione

Laura Paglione

Upholder, Metadata 2020
Throughout my career, I have embraced my nonlinear path as an engineer, graphic designer, consultant and computer scientist. My vast experience and unique point of view have helped me build a community of clients, colleagues, mentors, and mentees around a common goal: accessible innovation... Read More →
avatar for Laura Paglione

Laura Paglione

Spherical Cow Group
I have been actively building diverse communities for the past 10 years. Most recently my community building work has been centered on developing intentionally diverse, volunteer-based communities for global standards that consider what voices are missing from critical conversations... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 10:30 - 11:00 UTC
Stage 2

10:30 UTC

A Tale on Personal Uniqueness
Imagine a world without computers and without digital registration. Do you feel happy when you see this world? Or do you feel a bit sad?

We will look at the history of the the Danish social security number - Civil Personal Registration (CPR). CPR identifies all citizens in Denmark. The CPR is more than 50 years old and it has stories to tell. Stories that may teach us something on the world or registration.

In scholarly communication the ORCID iD appears to be more and more essential. In many aspects ORCID and the CPR may look alike, and we will see if lessons can be learnt from the history of CPR in ORCID implementations and developments.

Moderators
avatar for Matthew Buys

Matthew Buys

Executive Director, DataCite

Speakers
avatar for Poul Melchiorsen

Poul Melchiorsen

Specialist Consultant, Aalborg University Library
Coming out of philosophy, physics and computer science - now interested in research analysis, visualization and description across disciplines.



Thursday January 28, 2021 10:30 - 11:00 UTC
Stage 1

11:00 UTC

Deutsche - PIDs 101 - Einführung in die Welt der persistent Identifiers
Egal, ob Sie neu in der Welt der persistent Identifier sind oder nur eine grundlegende Auffrischung zu PIDs benötigen, diese Einführungssession ist für Sie! Wir erklären, was persistent Identifiers sind, was sie können und warum sie wichtig sind. Wir werden Ihre Fragen rund um PIDs beantworten und Sie mit den Informationen versorgen, die Sie brauchen, um selbst ein PIDler zu werden!

Moderators
avatar for Paul Vierkant

Paul Vierkant

Outreach Manager, DataCite
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4448-3844

Speakers
avatar for Britta Dreyer

Britta Dreyer

Business Manager, DataCite


Thursday January 28, 2021 11:00 - 11:30 UTC
Stage 3

11:00 UTC

PIDs for research (data) repositories - an invitation to chat over coffee, tea and cake
“Every day, once a day, give yourself a present. Don't plan it. Don't wait for it. Just let it happen. It could be [...] a catnap in your office chair, [...] two cups of good, hot black coffee… or PIDs for research repositories.” (an almost original quotation from Twin Peaks)

The re3data COREF project invites all participants to join us with a delicious piece of cake and a nice cup of coffee or tea to discuss the topic of PIDs for research (data) repositories. There will be pie charts and people are allowed to take notes on their table cloths (aka CryptPads). Of course we are interested in everyone’s opinion and will collect them via polling throughout the session.

We are excited to discuss with the community how y’all would use a PID to refer to a repository and how references to repositories can be improved.
PS: Please prepare a cup of tea or coffee/tea and bring your (selfmade) cake or pastry to the session (preferably dressed as your favourite Twin Peaks character). #aPieceOfPID #PIDapalooza21

Moderators
avatar for Bryan Vickery

Bryan Vickery

Crossref

Speakers
avatar for Lea Maria Ferguson

Lea Maria Ferguson

Helmholtz Association, Helmholtz Open Science Office
I work for the Helmholtz Open Science Office of the Helmholtz Association, promoting Open Science practices, distributing information, and providing a forum for discussions within the Helmholtz Association.My areas of interest include all aspects of Open Science, including Open Access, Open Data, and Open Research Software.Befo... Read More →
avatar for Nina Weisweiler

Nina Weisweiler

Consultant, Outreach & Community Manager, Helmholtz Open Science Office / re3data COREF
I work for the Helmholtz Open Science Office, promoting Open Science practices, distributing information, and providing a forum for discussions within the Helmholtz Association and beyond.I am also part of the re3data COREF project, together with our project partners from DataCit... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 11:00 - 11:30 UTC
Stage 1

11:00 UTC

Also Known As 
It is not unusual that an object has more that one identifier assigned to it. So how do we know that these multiple, alternate identifiers all refer to the same thing? It turns out that this is a common problem in supply chain management. This session presents a case study from the movie world (EIDR) and explores what can be learned from their experiences.

Moderators
avatar for Tom Demeranville

Tom Demeranville

Product Director, ORCID
Tom has been with ORCID for five years and is responsible for the ongoing evolution of the ORCID registry and services. He manages the ORCID roadmap, collaborates internally and externally to identify innovation opportunities, and ensures that ORCID is responsive to community ne... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Clark

Jonathan Clark

Managing Agent, The DOI Foundation
RD

Raymond Drewry

Principal Scientist, MovieLabs/EIDR


Thursday January 28, 2021 11:00 - 11:30 UTC
Stage 2

11:30 UTC

PIDs in Deutschland - Ein Future-Search-Ansatz
Die Sitzung beginnt mit einem Toast auf PIDs. Alle Teilnehmer*innen der Sitzung werden gebeten, ihr Lieblings-PID-Getränk (s. unten) zur Sitzung mitzubringen, um bei harter Arbeit gemeinsam etwas zu trinken. 
Die Arbeit beginnt mit einem kurzen Vortrag, der darauf zurückblickt, was hinsichtlich PIDs wie ORCID, DOI und ROR in Deutschland geleistet wurde, welche Entwicklungen es aktuell gibt, worauf wir stolz sind und was wir besser machen können.
Anschließend werden die wichtigsten Ziele für PIDs in Deutschland diskutiert. Diese können von der Community im Vorfeld unter Tricider (https://www.tricider.com/admin/2vv0rVCOKVZ/2xQxbVGkBhL) eingereicht und gevoted. Die 3 Ziele mit den meisten Stimmen werden zur Session thematisiert.
Blue DOIgune - Blaubeer-Smoothie: https://www.lidl-kochen.de/rezeptwelt/bananen-blaubeer-smoothie-124814 
ORCjito - Smoothie mit Minze: https://www.kuechengoetter.de/rezepte/gruener-smoothie-mit-minze-und-birnen-68210 
ROR at the beach - Smoothie mit Orangen- und Cranberrysaft: https://naturita.org/cranberry-orangen-smoothie/ 

Speakers
avatar for Antonia Schrader

Antonia Schrader

Helmholtz Association
avatar for Paul Vierkant

Paul Vierkant

Outreach Manager, DataCite
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4448-3844


Thursday January 28, 2021 11:30 - 12:00 UTC
Stage 3

11:30 UTC

Riffing on a PID Federation
The recently concluded FREYA project commissioned a report to explore the feasibility of a PID Federation or some other type of entity to ensure the sustainability of PID Service providers and their users. This session will update the community on the aspects of the idea explored during the consultation, the report's recommendations and the FREYA project's response to it. Attendees will also have the chance to provide feedback on the report's findings.

Moderators
avatar for Bryan Vickery

Bryan Vickery

Crossref

Speakers
TR

Torsten Reimer

Head of Content and Research Services, British Library
Dr Torsten Reimer is Head of Content and Research Services at the British Library. He is responsible for developing the services and contemporary collections through which the BL supports individual researchers and research organisations, online and onsite. Before joining the British... Read More →
FM

Frances Madden

Research Associate, British Library
Frances Madden is Research Identifiers Lead at The British Library, overseeing the BL's contribution to the FREYA project. Her role includes looking at integrating persistent identifiers into the BL's systems and representing the humanities and social sciences sectors within FREYA... Read More →
avatar for Rachael Kotarski

Rachael Kotarski

Head of Research Infrastructure Services, British Library


Thursday January 28, 2021 11:30 - 12:00 UTC
Stage 1

11:30 UTC

Technical aspects of publication in several languages - sharing best practices in multi-language publications
Here is a motivating example: https://doi.org/10.4213/rm892 and https://doi.org/10.1070/RM1997v052n06ABEH002155 are actually the same article (in Russian and English) but you would have never guessed if not for the link at http://www.mathnet.ru/php/archive.phtml?wshow=paper&jrnid=rm&paperid=892&option_lang=eng.

At this session we would like to discuss the problem of linking versions of the same article published in different languages. We will start by presenting what we learnt so far (hasTranslation and isTranslationOf relations on Crossref; ethical aspects of publishing in several languages, credit attribution beyond authorship, etc.) and then open the floor to community for sharing their stories, asking questions, etc. We would love to have it as diverse as possible, so please come also if you do not speak English.

Сессия открыта для тех, кто не говорит по английски!
Venite, anche se non parlate Inglese!
Ihr seid willkommen, auch wenn ihr kann kein English!


Moderators
avatar for Tom Demeranville

Tom Demeranville

Product Director, ORCID
Tom has been with ORCID for five years and is responsible for the ongoing evolution of the ORCID registry and services. He manages the ORCID roadmap, collaborates internally and externally to identify innovation opportunities, and ensures that ORCID is responsive to community ne... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Aliaksandr Birukou

Aliaksandr Birukou

Vice President, Springer Nature
Aliaksandr Birukou is Vice President Journals, Russia at Springer Nature, where he leads a team responsible for a portfolio of >200 journals in all disciplines translated from Russian and Ukrainian. He is also responsible for the Springer Nature strategy for publications of journals... Read More →
avatar for Alexey Skalaban

Alexey Skalaban

Expert, NEICON
Graduated from the Belarusian State University of Culture, specialization - automated library and information systems. From 2009 to August 2017,  served as director of the Scientific Library of the Belarusian National Technical University. Prior to that, he was engaged in the acquisition... Read More →



Thursday January 28, 2021 11:30 - 12:00 UTC
Stage 2

12:00 UTC

Ein PID-Festessen für die Forschung
Wir werden die Metadatenelemente vorstellen, die die perfekten Zutaten für ein offenes und FAIRes PID-Festessen für die Forschung ergeben. Wir werden die traditionellen Familienrezepte der deutschen Gemeinschaft untersuchen und verkosten und die allerbesten Zutaten und Praktiken auswählen. Gemeinsam werden wir dann das fabelhafteste PID-Festessen kochen!

Moderators
avatar for Paul Vierkant

Paul Vierkant

Outreach Manager, DataCite
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4448-3844

Speakers
MB

Marleen Burger

Technische Informationsbibliothek Hannover (TIB)
AC

Anette Cordts

Technische Informationsbibliothek Hannover (TIB)


Thursday January 28, 2021 12:00 - 12:30 UTC
Stage 3

12:00 UTC

Unheard Voices: Practice-based Arts Research and the PID Landscape 
A breakout session at Repository Fringe in Edinburgh in 2018 began the discussion on capturing practice-based arts research in repositories in the UK and discussed the fact that many repository systems don’t adequately reflect what this research looks like. At a similar time the UK focussed Practice Research Advisory Group – a researcher led community – was having discussions about how to ensure this research is discoverable and preserved for the long term. Awareness and experiences captured by these communities led Jisc to hold an event in March 2019 on Capturing Practice Research: improving visibility and searchability. What had been a UK focussed discussion was then taken to an international audience with a panel discussion session at Open Repositories in 2019 in Hamburg. These discussions have identified that the persistent identifier landscape isn’t really an even playing field for this research which doesn’t tend to look like other, more traditional forms of research.

This session aims to bring together interested people from all over the world to talk about PIDs in practice-based arts research. It will start with a brief case study on the experience at the University of Westminster, based in London in the UK, who engaged with their practice-based arts research community (and supplier Haplo) to develop their new open source repository software to identify what this research looks like and how the repository could better reflect it. We will then highlight how various Persistent Identifiers don’t quite fit the practice-research landscape – or where they could do, how and where practitioners require more specific guidance that addresses practice research. Without this, the many benefits of the PID graph/landscape are not available to the practice-based research community. The specific examples we will cover include: ORCID iDs, DOIs, RAID and the CRediT taxonomy.

Discussions have started in various PID communities (with discussions at the UK ORCID Consortium Work Types Event earlier this year) however they are very UK/Europe-centric and we feel that PIDapalooza is the perfect opportunity to engage with interested people from all over the world to bring conversations together.

Moderators
avatar for Bryan Vickery

Bryan Vickery

Crossref

Speakers
TM

Taylor Mudd

Haplo Services
Repository developer at Haplo.https://www.haplo.com/repositoryhttps://github.com/haplo-org/haplo-repositoryhttps://twitter.com/HaploRepo
avatar for Adam Vials Moore

Adam Vials Moore

Product specialist - pids, Jisc
Information networks, especially those involving persistent identifiers
avatar for Jenny Evans

Jenny Evans

Research Environment and Scholarly Comms Lead, University of Westminster


Thursday January 28, 2021 12:00 - 12:30 UTC
Stage 1

12:00 UTC

Traversing the PID Graph with DataCite Commons
Join us as we traverse the PID Graph with DataCite Commons! During the session, attendees will guide the sequence of use cases through interactive polling and will discover more about the power of the PID Graph and DataCite Commons. The session will include fun Q&A using Kahoot to keep everyone engaged. All you need to do is show up with an internet connection and an interest in exploring the PID Graph.

The PID Graph was built on the basis that researchers, institutions, publications, datasets, and other research entities are interconnected through relational metadata. Entities and the relationships between them form a conceptual graph of the connected research landscape. Having unique persistent identifiers for researchers and their outputs is crucial to connecting pieces of the research landscape together. PIDs already have the potential to enable the connected research graph, but we’re not yet taking full advantage of their connecting powers through relational metadata.

We can link PIDs together via relations in their metadata to enable the discovery of connections at least two “hops” away. We typically understand the first "hop" e.g. the relationship between an individual, dataset and institution; and now the PID Graph allows us to understand two "hops" e.g. an individual, dataset and institution that is related to another individual, article and funder. The session will focus on using DataCite Commons as we explore different use cases and share more about our plans for connected PID infrastructure within DataCite Commons.


Moderators
avatar for Tom Demeranville

Tom Demeranville

Product Director, ORCID
Tom has been with ORCID for five years and is responsible for the ongoing evolution of the ORCID registry and services. He manages the ORCID roadmap, collaborates internally and externally to identify innovation opportunities, and ensures that ORCID is responsive to community ne... Read More →

Speakers
SW

Sarala Wimalaratne

Product Engineering Director, DataCite
avatar for Matthew Buys

Matthew Buys

Executive Director, DataCite


Thursday January 28, 2021 12:00 - 12:30 UTC
Stage 2

12:30 UTC

INCIPIT: ein ARK-Attributionsservice in der Schweiz
Der Vortrag wird in deutscher Sprache gehalten. Die Fragerunde wird in Englisch und Deutsch durchgeführt.
 
 INCIPIT (Infrastructure Nationale d'un Complément d'Identifiants Pérennes, Interopérables et Traçables) ist ein Projekt mit einer Laufzeit von Januar bis Dezember 2020, das durch das P-5 Programm von swissuniversities im Rahmen des Call 192 finanziert sowie von der Haute école de gestion de Genève (HEG-GE) gegenfinanziert wird.

INCIPIT versteht sich als eine ergänzende Infrastruktur für die kostengünstige Zuweisung von persistenten Identifikatoren (PIDs) für jedwedes Konzept bzw. jedwede Ressource auf der Grundlage des Archival Resource Key (ARK). Das Ziel der Implementierung eines solchen ARK-Attributionsservices für die Schweiz, den das INCIPIT-Projekt an der HEG-GE mit Hilfe der Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) starten wird, besteht darin, die Bedürfnisse der wissenschaftlichen Gemeinschaft zu decken, die massgeschneiderte und flexible Dienstleistungen für eine persistente Identifikation nachfragt, in erster Linie Forschungsdaten, die zum Long Tail gehören. Besondere Berücksichtigung sollen dabei die Interessen des Bereichs des Kulturerbes haben, d.h. Bibliotheken, Archive und Museen.
INCIPIT hat eng mit dem EZID-Dienst der California Digital Library und der ARKs in the Open-Initiative (jetzt ARK Alliance genannt) zusammengearbeitet, um eine stabile Infrastruktur zu schaffen. Der Allokationsdienst wurde in ARKetype umbenannt und wird Ende Januar in einer Alpha-Version starten.


Link zur Präsentation: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4436022
----------------The presentation will be held in German. The Q/A session will be conducted in English and German. 

INCIPIT (Infrastructure Nationale d’un Complément d’Identifiants Pérennes, Interopérables et Traçables) is a project that runs from January to December 2020 and is funded by the swissuniversities' P-5 programme under the call 192 as well as being co-financed by the Haute école de gestion de Genève (HEG-GE).

 INCIPIT has been developing a complementary infrastructure for the low-cost attribution of persistent identifiers (PIDs) to any concept or resource based on the Archival Resource Key (ARK) scheme. The aim of the implementation of an ARK allocation service in Switzerland, which the INCIPIT project will initiate at the HEG-GE in Geneva with the help of the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), is to cover the needs of the scientific community that requests tailored and flexible services in the broadest sense of the term, first and foremost research data belonging to the long tail and especially by responding to the interests of the cultural heritage field (libraries, archives, museums).

 INCIPIT has been collaborating closely with the California Digital Library's EZID service and ARKs in the Open initiative (now called ARK Alliance) to create a robust infrastructure.
The allocation service has been renamed ARKetype and will be launched at the end of January in an alpha version.


URL to the slide deck: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4436022

Moderators
avatar for Paul Vierkant

Paul Vierkant

Outreach Manager, DataCite
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4448-3844

Speakers
RS

René Schneider

Haute Ecole de Gestion
avatar for Julien A. Raemy

Julien A. Raemy

Research and Teaching Assistant in Information Science, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Haute école de gestion de Genève
Julien A. Raemy is a Research and Teaching Assistant in Information Science at the HES-SO University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Haute école de gestion de Genève.He obtained a BSc in Library and Information Science (2017) and a MSc in Information Science (2020) from the Haute... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 12:30 - 13:00 UTC
Stage 3

12:30 UTC

You can’t put an ankle bracelet on ideas … or can you?
How might we identify what gets captured and what remains uncaptured and why is that important to humanities scholars worldwide? How can we make better use of open research infrastructures to focus on all parts of the research and publishing process and ensure these are recognised, linked and discoverable; just as with traditional research products?

Join public humanities scholars and publishers to workshop how to better define the open publication pathway and assign the right PIDs for engaged scholars in the humanities.

Session prep - update 26 Jan
We'll be annotating this during our session - feel free to dig in before Thursday's session! And asking these questions:
  • How might we indicate how publicly engaged scholarship aligns with OR practices?
  • What do publishing structures need to do support public humanities publication aspirations?
https://lucid.app/lucidspark/6d65c467-9e7f-4d3d-a2c2-4d39a67822c5/edit?beaconFlowId=8464C28B69FD90DB#?folder_id=home&browser=icon 



Moderators
avatar for Matthew Buys

Matthew Buys

Executive Director, DataCite

Speakers
avatar for Kath Burton

Kath Burton

Portfolio Development - Humanities, Routledge, Taylor & Francis
I have held a number of scholarly communication roles from managing editor to director, squarely situated within the humanities and social sciences over the past 15 years. Now working in portfolio development for Routledge, Taylor & Francis and co-convener of the Publishing and Publicly... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Cannon

Matthew Cannon

Head of Open Research, Taylor & Francis Group
Hi everyone. I'm the Head of Open Research for Taylor & Francis journals based in the UK. I am really interested in increasing reproducibility and transparency of research. PIDs are a really important way of increasing transparency through linking of all kinds of research stakeholders... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Fisher

Daniel Fisher

HUC-JIR/Cincinnati and National Humanties Alliance



Thursday January 28, 2021 12:30 - 13:00 UTC
Stage 1

12:30 UTC

Funding flashmob: registering and connecting grants with Crossref & Europe PMC
Join Crossref and Europe PMC so we can bring you up to speed on why we’re working together with funders to register grant metadata and create global identifiers for grants. *Spoiler alert* connecting grant information and persistent identifiers with research outputs will help researchers, funders, publishers and institutions easily see the outputs that result from individual grants. It makes grant metadata openly available to help identify connections between projects and collaborators. And will avoid duplication of effort in reporting and overlapping grants or repeated projects.

Europe PMC were early adopters, registering grants for Wellcome since 2019, and have since been joined by a growing number of other organizations as this initiative scales up. Come along to our session to find out what our plans are and see grant metadata in action in our funding flashmob!

Moderators
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement, DataCite

Speakers
avatar for Christine Ferguson

Christine Ferguson

Information Specialist, Europe PMC (EMBL-EBI)
PIDs for the life sciences|Open Science|Europe PMC|Literature repository
avatar for Rachael Lammey

Rachael Lammey

Head of Special Programs, Crossref


Thursday January 28, 2021 12:30 - 13:00 UTC
Stage 2

13:00 UTC

Français - Introduction aux identifiants pérennes (PIDs)
Que vous soyez nouveau dans le monde des identifiants pérennes (PIDs) ou que vous ayez simplement besoin d'un rappel des notions de base, cette session d'introduction est faite pour vous! Nous vous expliquerons ce qu'est un identifiant pérenne, ce qu'ils peuvent faire et pourquoi il sont importants; et nous partagerons des informations sur certains PIDs clés. Notre conférencier répondra à vos questions et vous fournira les informations dont vous avez besoin pour devenir une personne PID vous-même!

Speakers
avatar for Gabriela Mejias

Gabriela Mejias

Engagement Manager, ORCID
NISO Plus 2020 Scholarship Awardee


Thursday January 28, 2021 13:00 - 13:30 UTC
Stage 3

13:00 UTC

PID Forum 2.0 — Tell Us What You Want, What You Really Really Want
Where do you go for your PID news? Where do you interact with your PID colleagues? Where do you ask your PID questions? The answer is — or should be! — the PID Forum!

As pidforum.org starts a new phase of life with its new host, NISO, following the conclusion of the FREYA Project, we want to hear how we can make it even more useful for all you PID people out there! This interactive session will enable you to tell us what you think of the changes so far, what else you’d like us to focus on, and how you’d like to get involved in the PID Forum 2.0.

Speakers
avatar for Rachael Lammey

Rachael Lammey

Head of Special Programs, Crossref
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement, DataCite
FM

Frances Madden

Research Associate, British Library
Frances Madden is Research Identifiers Lead at The British Library, overseeing the BL's contribution to the FREYA project. Her role includes looking at integrating persistent identifiers into the BL's systems and representing the humanities and social sciences sectors within FREYA... Read More →
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director of Community Engagement, NISO


Thursday January 28, 2021 13:00 - 13:30 UTC
Stage 2

13:00 UTC

PInDtegration: Dropping PIDs into Web Applications
No one memorizes their co-authors’ ORCIDs, yet we ask people to enter them into forms in data and publication systems. Why? PIDs are unique, but they aren’t user friendly. What if users could start typing a name or email and select from a list of matching ORCID entries? What if applications could store only the ORCID but display the name, email, and link to an ORCID profile? What if such capabilities could be added without a lot of custom programming? What if all PIDs worked this way?

We are exploring the potential to use generic Javascript libraries to provide these capabilities, using the Qualitative Data Repository at Syracuse University and the open-source Dataverse software as an initial platform. This presentation will include a simple demonstration using ORCID and raise the question as to whether PID providers should start providing such libraries to simplify adoption and increase the value of PIDs.


Moderators
avatar for Matthew Buys

Matthew Buys

Executive Director, DataCite

Speakers
avatar for Jim Myers

Jim Myers

Software Designer/Developer, self-employed
avatar for Sebastian Karcher

Sebastian Karcher

Associate Director, Qualitative Data Repository
Qualitative data, data sharing, data citations, Zotero.Presentation slides: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.9989012.v1
avatar for Nicholas Weber

Nicholas Weber

Assistant Professor, University of Washington
Nic Weber is an assistant professor at the University of Washington's iSchool and the Technical Director of the Qualitative Data Repository, hosted by the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. His research focus on sustainability from a systems-thinking perspective. He is broadly interested in the idea of commons governance, and the use of public sector information (open data) for so... Read More →


Thursday January 28, 2021 13:00 - 13:30 UTC
Stage 1

13:30 UTC

Les Identifiants pérennes en France et au CNRS
Moderators
avatar for Gabriela Mejias

Gabriela Mejias

Engagement Manager, ORCID
NISO Plus 2020 Scholarship Awardee

Speakers
avatar for Mohamed Salah Yahia

Mohamed Salah Yahia

Ingénieur d'étude, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS_ France)


Thursday January 28, 2021 13:30 - 14:00 UTC
Stage 3

13:30 UTC

Research Funders: as both beneficiaries and enablers of change, how can we work together to help shape the PID ecosystem?
[ slides: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4439098  ] Among research funders, there is increasing interest in a more in depth understanding of both the effects of funded research projects and the performance of funding instruments. Although research funding organisations collect a lot of information about research projects they fund, it is often difficult to re-use this information for strategic decision making. Challenges in collecting good quality, reusable data are multiple and intertwined. They include researchers failing to register their outputs on funders’ systems, name ambiguities of both people and institutions, and the use of a wide range of metadata practices. Together, these information challenges undermine funders’ ability to systematically assess the outcomes of funded research.  

In this session, we present a ‘holistic’ PID strategy to improve the Dutch Research Council’s (NWO) capacity to analyze the effects of the research it funds. In this strategy, developed together with SURF (Cooperative for ICT in Dutch education and research), we propose implementation of persistent identifiers in NWO’s grant and reporting workflows, together with recommendations for national and international stakeholder engagement. Given the international nature of research and associated infrastructures, it is particularly important to ensure that national efforts are also well coordinated internationally.

As funders have occupied attention space at PIDapalooza since its inception, our aim is to join this tradition and call on PID-engaged and PID-curious funders to join our session. We invite comment and critique on the NWO PID strategy, and ideas about ways in which funders can work together to help shape the PID ecosystem.

Moderators
avatar for Matthew Buys

Matthew Buys

Executive Director, DataCite

Speakers
MC

Maria Cruz

Dutch Research Council
avatar for Clifford Tatum

Clifford Tatum

SURF / CWTS, Leiden University
Consultant, Persistent Identifiers (innovation group) at SURF, in the Netherlands. And researcher at CWTS, Leiden University, focusing on infrastructures of openness in relation to emerging evaluation practices.


Thursday January 28, 2021 13:30 - 14:00 UTC
Stage 1

13:30 UTC

Linking preprints to published papers - how good are your metadata? (spoiler: not that good)

Moderators
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement, DataCite

Speakers
avatar for Bianca Kramer

Bianca Kramer

Utrecht University
Bianca Kramer is librarian for life sciences and medicine at Utrecht University Library, with a strong focus on scholarly communication and Open Science.


Thursday January 28, 2021 13:30 - 14:00 UTC
Stage 2

14:00 UTC

PIDs Double Act — Persistent Identifiers at OPERAS and SciELO
PIDs implementation: requirements and strategies in scholarly communication - the OPERAS and OpenEdition cases
By ensuring the persistent discoverability of digital objects or persons, the Persistent Identifiers are essential to the scholarly communication actors: PIDs help them to fulfill their mission of disseminating research outputs. In that prospect, providing visibility to the authors and their research, and findability to the readers through the use of PIDs require a dedicated effort from the infrastructure. However, requirements, recommendations, and options determine the possible strategies for such an implementation. In the range of activities of OpenEdition, from its very publishing platforms to the European projects for scholarly communication it coordinates, various challenges appear for this implementation process. The various requirements or recommendations from PlanS, FAIR principles, EOSC interoperability framework give generic indications which do not always address the specificities of PID implementation in the context of open scholarly communication. In particular, the implementation of PIDs can be a challenge for countries and languages not well represented or integrated within the global scientific landscape. The presentation will give examples of PIDs implementation’s options and strategies from the OpenEdition platforms, the OPERAS discovery service TRIPLE, and the activities of OPERAS in the GOFAIR context.

PIDs as critical component of research visibility pose challenges to developing countries - the SciELO network case to overcome language, financial and infrastructure limitations
Research object communications such as articles, journals, book chapters etc. have visibility as a key attribute. It applies to all research fields, geographies, and languages. Amid the visibility boosters are the PIDs of bibliographic elements such as ORCID as author identifier and research object as DOI as article identifier. Standardized PIDs foster interoperability at global scale and contribute to access, use and impact of research objects. So, to have or not a PID became a determinant condition for research communication objects to be included in the global flow of scientific information. Therefore, national, and institutional capacities and infrastructures to operate PIDs are essential requirements for research communication objects to acquire visibility in the global flow of scientific information. As standardized global PIDs have been generated and primarily disseminate in English speaking developed countries, it poses a challenge to developing countries to overcome exclusion as well as financial and infrastructure limitations to embed their research object communication with the appropriate persistent identifiers to become proactive players of an envisaged equitable, inclusive, diverse global flow of scientific information. This presentation will describe SciELO Program adoption of PIDs towards more visibility and participation in the global flow of scientific information.

Moderators
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director of Community Engagement, NISO

Speakers
AG

Arnaud Gingold

OpenEdition


Thursday January 28, 2021 14:00 - 14:30 UTC
Stage 1

14:30 UTC

Dancing with the Scientists, Track 2: Dancing in Place
Being the last presentation of the conference, it will be out of date before I even get started...
But we will start with a rousing song and dance number, followed by some fun with geography as an illustration of some ideas about how we can move the scientific record towards a linked data approach that looks both backwards and forwards in time. Some illustrations and issues in biomedical science and public health that have arisen from the COVID-19 pandemic will be presented. Be ready to show your dance moves and geography knowledge in the speed round!

Moderators
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director of Community Engagement, NISO

Speakers
avatar for Kathryn Kaiser

Kathryn Kaiser

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama @ Birmingham
I am working towards making the scientific record a fully integrated, relational database that makes research permanently findable! These days, I can always be found working in Birmingham (guess which one!) 33.516136449924076, -86.77198727305536


Thursday January 28, 2021 14:30 - 15:00 UTC
Stage 1

15:00 UTC

Closing Ceremony
Join us to bring PIDapalooza21 to a close and extinguish the eternal flame.

Thursday January 28, 2021 15:00 - 15:30 UTC
Stage 1
 
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